The Chainlink

. . . Or "on your right"?

In order to be ready to run a marathon this October, I've started to appear more often on the LFT as one of those annoying joggers a.k.a. runners.

I do try hard to be not very annoying, though, given my own reaction to 'em joggers. Do upon others, practice what you preach, and all that. I look back before making turn or changing lanes, I even point to the direction I am about to make a move, just like I would do when I ride my bike.

I found that something is almost totally missing now.

It didn't take me long to realize what it was: almost never do I hear a warning from cyclists overtaking me, even when they pass within a couple of inches.

Has "passing on your left" gone out of fashion? Do cyclists save their breath, considering that runners and others will not hear them, anyway?

Or, may be, cyclists are trying not to annoy runners?

WTF?

(Sorry, Chi Lowe ;)

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I ride from Uptown down to the Loop on the LFP daily, always call passing and have never lost my voice as a result.

Get a bell and a new excuse.

I guess there's a need for clarification here.

I don't think it matters what kind of warning one prefers, yell, bell or siren, right?

Just let them know that you're coming from behind. At the very least, it might serve as a CYA: if they don't hear, or ignore your warning, it will be their fault.

In searching for this video I saw a few weeks ago:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SG0uBDvgXu0

I noticed that many of the BMX folks appear to want their hubs to make more noise, not less...  Me, I want things as quiet as possible.

At the very least, it might serve as a CYA: if they don't hear, or ignore your warning, it will be their fault.

I think this is the attitude that angers pedestrians on the receiving end. No, it will not be their fault if you hit them while passing. It is your responsibility to pass safely, or to wait until you are able to do so. This is a common feature of every system of "rules of the road" that I have ever heard of, from US driving rules to marine navigation rules: it is the overtaking vehicle that must keep clear of the vehicle being overtaken, not vice versa. Why should it work differently on the LFP?

The real excuse is that I'm lazy damn it! The second excuse is that when I do yell on your left people take it the wrong way. I have been yelled at for giving people a heads up and for not giving a heads up. I should get a bell they are more friendly than this yelling business.

Uptown to the loop! Man that's 100% of the worst part of the path. I ride from Addison to Hyde and don't feel like I can relax until I hit soldier field.

Louis Silverman said:

I ride from Uptown down to the Loop on the LFP daily, always call passing and have never lost my voice as a result.

Get a bell and a new excuse.

Eli, I would agree with you (notice all those "at the very least," "might serve as," etc. I put in my post), if indeed runners and pedestrians were behaving predictably all the time. Yes, I give the warning, I slow down, I try to give as much space as I can and so forth, but if a walker/jogger ignores, for whatever reason, all of the above and turns right in front of me, is it STILL my fault?!
Hell f****** no.

Every time you overtake someone by surprise it reinforces the idea that bikes are rude and inconsiderate.

Announcing yourself may not be heard every time you do it but it is heard most of the time... and often you will hear a "thank you" from the person you're overtaking.   

Ha!  I would have loved to see that reaction.  ;)

Tom Z said:

That happened to me! I couldn't believe it. Lady got pissed and freaked out "HOLY SHIT JESUS!!!"

You should have screamed "Where?"

I have about 8-10 more left: Bell for a Buck.  I took the bag home yesterday, but I can bring them back and meet people wherever...

steve rulz said:

 I should get a bell they are more friendly than this yelling business.

Because there are people who choose to walk/run/bike three abreast and block the entire trail.

Eli Naeher said:

At the very least, it might serve as a CYA: if they don't hear, or ignore your warning, it will be their fault.

I think this is the attitude that angers pedestrians on the receiving end. No, it will not be their fault if you hit them while passing. It is your responsibility to pass safely, or to wait until you are able to do so. This is a common feature of every system of "rules of the road" that I have ever heard of, from US driving rules to marine navigation rules: it is the overtaking vehicle that must keep clear of the vehicle being overtaken, not vice versa. Why should it work differently on the LFP?

Michelle,
I do sometimes (not that often, unfortunately) hear people thanking me for giving the warning.
But I ALWAYS thank everyone for even acknowledging my warning. They don't have to move out of my way (I'm not asking for that), just let me know that they heard me and are not going to jump right in front of me. I think it's not too much to ask for.

. . . But! I was riding to the latest Shamrock Shuffle, two months ago. A group of the "elite" runners are running to the same event, three abreast, with another one following. I rang my bell, that last guy looked back at me, and moved to join his friends to run FOUR ABREAST, effectively blocking the whole width of the trail.
Mit der Dummheit kampfen Gotter selbst vergebens.

On the water, there are no lane markings and anyone can go anywhere, even in channels.   (Sometimes I have an incredible grasp of the obvious.)  No matter where, the overtaking vessel must yield to the vessel being overtaken, and an overtaking vessel is required to clearly signal its intention to pass.  Of course, that signaling intention thing works about as well on the water as it does on the LFP.

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