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I was wondering if anyone has advice/suggestions on how to pull a bicycle using a bicycle? I've done the "pull a bike behind using my arm" thing, but I didn't like it too much as I had some trouble steering and I got some uncomfortable (you stole that bike) stares. Anyway, I've got 2 occassions coming up where pulling a bike would come in handy. I have a rear rack and I'm thinking the best way would to somehow attach the front wheel of the transported bike to the rack so that only the rear wheel is rolling. And I'm guessing one or some of you smart people have done this before. If you have, let me know or if you have any other suggestions, please shoot.

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I've contemplated this same problem, when taking a bike to the shop, so I'm curious to see what clever solutions folks may suggest.

Yup I've had to transport bikes a bunch. I've discussed it with a lot of the "experts" and here are the solutions I've done or heard of:

Ghost riding- I think it's the one you mentioned. I roll it beside me like I have super wide handlebars. It's just fine for 5 miles or so

Over-the-shoulder- I've even put complete bikes over my shoulder. You just insert your body into that triangle. It's best if you put a blanket or a lot of padding on the shoulder that is against a tube. I can do it 5 miles before pain is too tough.

Disassemble and put on the rear rack - on my touring bike, you can put the fork in backwards and tube tie it to a rear rack. I have beefy surly nice racks. Then you can put the wheels wherever you want (messenger bag). With a good setup, you can do this as long as your little legs desire.

Borrow a Yuba-esque bike or trailer - the guys I know who powder coat bikes or work at a parts company have them and transport bikes that way all the time. You just need to make worthy friends ;)

Bolt one of these (http://www.autoanything.com/bike-racks/69A6248A0A0.aspx) onto an 8" long piece of 2x4. Bungee, strap, ratchet, etc the 2x4 (now with the bike mount) onto the top of your rack.

Now you can remove the front tire of the bike you need to tow and hook it to the bike mount. the rear wheel will roll along behind you. Bungee the front wheel to the frame of the towed bike.

Sorry I don't have any pictures right now to show as an example.

Keep the other bike next to you and steer it with one hand on the stem. Go slow, and take the side streets. Works best if the bike that you ride allows you to put both feet on the ground while seated on the saddle. In my case, I ride my wife's bike.

As for the stares, just alpha dog stare back at them. Works every time for me.

I've actually been offered money more than once for the bike that I pulled along. I just laugh it off.

Edit: I think it the same thing that Jack Crowe called ghost riding in an earlier reply.

I recently had this come up when there was a rider and a bike.  A friend had  a broken chain.  Nobody had a chain tool. We needed to go little over a mile.  We held hands. That was the best way to go.  As we approached stops, I would launch him so he could coast to the stop and then brake on his own.  We would re grip and get going when the light turned green. It helped that it was early morning with little traffic and we were near the United Center where the boulevards are wide. It was effective and it brought us closer.

The method described above would be similar for a bike without a rider.  Instead of holding hands, hold the left side of the handlebar with your right hand while gripping your own bar with the left hand. If you are riding one handed its better to have the left hand  (front brake) on the bar. I have strapped a wheel to my back with a luggage or bag strap. I'm kind of short to do this with an entire bike.

I forgot to mention that I've got a torn rotator cuff (right shoulder) so ghost riding is def a no go. Anyway, I think there is a more elegant solution. Will, have you tried your solution before? I like the idea, but not the cost. I think a similar rack could be build with an old hub/skewer.

Here's how I carried it when I turned the fork upside down after I had my polo bike painted and v brake posts brazed. I'm sure you could find somewhere to put the wheels.

That is one ugly man...

Jack Crowe said:

Here's how I carried it when I turned the fork upside down after I had my polo bike painted and v brake posts brazed. I'm sure you could find somewhere to put the wheels.

The bike racks on CTA buses hold two bikes...

I think you're missing the spirit of the discussion.

Jared said:

The bike racks on CTA buses hold two bikes...

If you're hell-bent on the bike being "towed" rather than just carried, the only way to do so safely would be to rig something that allows the towed bike to be reasonably horizontal and has only the back wheel on the ground.  I think Alex W had fork mounts on the back of a trailer at some point in the past and it worked to tow two additional bikes behind the trailer, IIRC.

It's not that I'm hell-bent on the idea of towing rather than carrying, I've got a messed up shoulder (see post above) which means that I can't carry. Besides there are probably a lot of other people interested in how to tow because they may not be physically able to carry a bike while biking.

h' 1.0 said:

If you're hell-bent on the bike being "towed" rather than just carried, the only way to do so safely would be to rig something that allows the towed bike to be reasonably horizontal and has only the back wheel on the ground.  I think Alex W had fork mounts on the back of a trailer at some point in the past and it worked to tow two additional bikes behind the trailer, IIRC.

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