I am in the market for a cargo bike.  For one reason, I am interested in transporting my daughter (age 7) on my bike.  From my research, I really like the Xtracycle Hooptie attachment for safely transporting children.

My problem, I do not like the Xtracycle Freeradical attachment.  I really like the Yuba Mundo cargo bike and I would like to attach something like the Xtracycle Hooptie product to a Yuba.

Has anyone done this or know of any other cargo bike owners who attached a Hooptie to a Mundo?

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There are practical reasons why the step-through frame was picked as better for this purpose and having this be a deciding factor seems pretty ridiculous and insecure. 


David 4.0 said:


Watch this TED video by the Xtracycle founder and CEO Ross Evans where he states "The Radish is based on a girls bike frame".  I did not make that comment up, it came from the CEO of Xtracycle.  Start watching the video at the 9:00 minute mark where Ross makes this statement.

YMMV, but I've owned a Xtracycle with the Free Radical conversion kit on a Trek FX, stolen :-( , and testedthe Mundo & Trek Transport.  I loved my Xtracycle and I never had any problems or concerns with the bike's stiffness or rigidity.  I would routinely carry 4 grocery bags and occasionally large boxes without any issues.  If I had a spare bike laying around (the FX was free), I would build up another in a second.  For the price it's great.  I also liked the riding position I had on the FX, which was more "aggressive" than the mundo or Trek Transport, but by no means like a road bike.  It may have helped that I mainly ride from Wrigley to downtown, which is about as flat as possible, and wasn't off-roading at any time (some may argue that the city streets may be comparable!).

The Mundo is a BEAST.  Very very solid.  But it also weighs a ton and has a more relaxed riding position.  I liked it, but decided against purchasing one due to the weight and limited accessories compared to an Xtracycle (I would have actually rigged the Xtracycle bags to the Mundo since I prefer them to the Yuba bags).  Electric motors are an option for the Mundo.  The Trek Transport - in theory the folding rear platforms is awesome, in use they make a lot of noise and can be annoying.  The Transport frame is aluminum, though, so it is lighter than the Mundo.

Another option is Sun Atlas Cargo (http://www.sunbicycles.com/product_detail.php?short_code=Atlas+Carg...).  This has admittedly inferior construction (welds can be crooked, low grade running gear, etc.) but the price point is very competitive.  Xtracycle actually sold them for a short time online last year as they are compatible with Xtracycle accessories. Other options are Surly, Kona.

It would be great if they were all available from a single shop, and one could test ride them all.

David 4.0 said:

I am just so torn between the Yuba, Free Radical conversion kit, and the Trek Transport.  So many options.

Whoops, never mind.

LOL...I am secure.  But, I think you may have missed my point.  The CEO decided they should use a girls bike frame.  I think that alone is an interesting fact. 

However, that has nothing to do with my reasoning for not liking the bike.  Equally, I am very well versed on cargo bikes and step through frames, so I understand the design approach. 

Moreover, the Radish in my opinion is not a good cargo bike.  Consider, I have actually test ridden one, so I am not shooting from the hip with my feedback.



Peenworm Grubologist said:

There are practical reasons why the step-through frame was picked as better for this purpose and having this be a deciding factor seems pretty ridiculous and insecure. 


David 4.0 said:


Watch this TED video by the Xtracycle founder and CEO Ross Evans where he states "The Radish is based on a girls bike frame".  I did not make that comment up, it came from the CEO of Xtracycle.  Start watching the video at the 9:00 minute mark where Ross makes this statement.

I have owned a Trek Transport for two years now, and really like it.  I was debating between the Transport, a Surly Big Dummy and a Bullitt by Larry vs Harry (a fancy bakfiets), and ultimately went with the Transport.  Price was the main consideration, because it cost 1/2 to 1/3 of the other bikes.

The biggest problem I've had with the Transport is that the aluminum frame, while light, tends to flex under a big load.  While it does not seem as "laterally stiff" as the Big Dummy, it  is much more solid that the Xtracycles I've ridden.

I also understand people's complaints about the folding rear platforms on the Transport are noisy, but I was able to address those problems with the creative use of electrical tape at the pivot points.  I hate rattling noises on a bike, and my Transport is pretty quiet (not as quiet as my road bike, but quiet).

On the plus side,  I can haul a lot of stuff.  Not as much as I could with a bakfiets, but I routinely load it with 8-10 bags of groceries (with my son), carry stuff to the beach (with my son and other kids), tow other bikes, whatever.  It rides well, is easy to maintain, and it has Trek's lifetime warranty on the frame.  

Plus, the seat adjusts enough that both my wife and I can ride the bike comfortably, which is great.

I'm definitely pleased with the purchase, and think that the Trek Transport provides huge value for the money.


David 4.0 said:

I am just so torn between the Yuba, Free Radical conversion kit, and the Trek Transport.  So many options.

Thanks for your feedback.  I also researched the Kona Ute and Sun Atlas, but decided against those as  options.  I think you are right, so the real choice for me remains between the Free Radical and a Yuba Mundo.  I would not pay extra for the Edgerunner (even though it is very nice).

 

I have a Trek 7300 (one of my many bikes), so a Free Radical would make a really nice addition!   Plus, that would elminate the need for any modifications to use the Hooptie.  Ok, I think I might be closer to a real decision.  Let's see if that changes after attending the Bike Swap on Saturday and checking out all the various cargo bikes.

 

JM 6.5 said:

YMMV, but I've owned a Xtracycle with the Free Radical conversion kit on a Trek FX, stolen :-( , and testedthe Mundo & Trek Transport.  I loved my Xtracycle and I never had any problems or concerns with the bike's stiffness or rigidity.  I would routinely carry 4 grocery bags and occasionally large boxes without any issues.  If I had a spare bike laying around (the FX was free), I would build up another in a second.  For the price it's great.  I also liked the riding position I had on the FX, which was more "aggressive" than the mundo or Trek Transport, but by no means like a road bike.  It may have helped that I mainly ride from Wrigley to downtown, which is about as flat as possible, and wasn't off-roading at any time (some may argue that the city streets may be comparable!).

The Mundo is a BEAST.  Very very solid.  But it also weighs a ton and has a more relaxed riding position.  I liked it, but decided against purchasing one due to the weight and limited accessories compared to an Xtracycle (I would have actually rigged the Xtracycle bags to the Mundo since I prefer them to the Yuba bags).  Electric motors are an option for the Mundo.  The Trek Transport - in theory the folding rear platforms is awesome, in use they make a lot of noise and can be annoying.  The Transport frame is aluminum, though, so it is lighter than the Mundo.

Another option is Sun Atlas Cargo (http://www.sunbicycles.com/product_detail.php?short_code=Atlas+Carg...).  This has admittedly inferior construction (welds can be crooked, low grade running gear, etc.) but the price point is very competitive.  Xtracycle actually sold them for a short time online last year as they are compatible with Xtracycle accessories. Other options are Surly, Kona.

It would be great if they were all available from a single shop, and one could test ride them all.

David 4.0 said:

I am just so torn between the Yuba, Free Radical conversion kit, and the Trek Transport.  So many options.

I'll toss my support in for the FreeRadical and authentic Hooptie (and the over engineered but great kickback stand, for ease of loading kids). My 4 year old daughter and I roll around with this setup hooked to a Surly Karate Monkey, and we love the thing. I don't tow any Honda Civics, but 6 full grocery bags, a lightweight kid (31lbs) and her bike in tow, no problems.

When I first built up the FreeRadical, I used a cheap old steel road frame (because it was what I had available), and had flex and vibration issues galore, enough that I took the plunge and bought a reasonably priced solid frame. If you hook the FreeRadical to a strong frame you won't have any flex issues at all, and you can pick and choose what style of position you like. Also, a used FreeRadical can be found for a good price, that is how I acquired mine. Spent a few years with the daughter in the Yepp seat, but we just graduated to a Hooptie with some side runners this Christmas (no pictures of that setup yet, sorry)

Here are some links to pictures pre-hooptie:

https://plus.google.com/107169285990829634147/posts/Tq6P3RwdLjY

https://plus.google.com/107169285990829634147/posts/QLSJCsU7s2Z

Joe, thanks for sharing the feedback on a Trek.  I should take one for a test ride based on your feedback.

Joe Studer 8.0 mi said:

I have owned a Trek Transport for two years now, and really like it.  I was debating between the Transport, a Surly Big Dummy and a Bullitt by Larry vs Harry (a fancy bakfiets), and ultimately went with the Transport.  Price was the main consideration, because it cost 1/2 to 1/3 of the other bikes.

The biggest problem I've had with the Transport is that the aluminum frame, while light, tends to flex under a big load.  While it does not seem as "laterally stiff" as the Big Dummy, it  is much more solid that the Xtracycles I've ridden.

I also understand people's complaints about the folding rear platforms on the Transport are noisy, but I was able to address those problems with the creative use of electrical tape at the pivot points.  I hate rattling noises on a bike, and my Transport is pretty quiet (not as quiet as my road bike, but quiet).

On the plus side,  I can haul a lot of stuff.  Not as much as I could with a bakfiets, but I routinely load it with 8-10 bags of groceries (with my son), carry stuff to the beach (with my son and other kids), tow other bikes, whatever.  It rides well, is easy to maintain, and it has Trek's lifetime warranty on the frame.  

Plus, the seat adjusts enough that both my wife and I can ride the bike comfortably, which is great.

I'm definitely pleased with the purchase, and think that the Trek Transport provides huge value for the money.


David 4.0 said:

I am just so torn between the Yuba, Free Radical conversion kit, and the Trek Transport.  So many options.

Zach, thanks for the FreeRadical plug.  I agree, the Hooptie is very appealing.  That is the whole reason I am considering a cargo bike, to take my daughter along for the ride with using a bike trailer.

Zach Roberts said:

I'll toss my support in for the FreeRadical and authentic Hooptie (and the over engineered but great kickback stand, for ease of loading kids). My 4 year old daughter and I roll around with this setup hooked to a Surly Karate Monkey, and we love the thing. I don't tow any Honda Civics, but 6 full grocery bags, a lightweight kid (31lbs) and her bike in tow, no problems.

When I first built up the FreeRadical, I used a cheap old steel road frame (because it was what I had available), and had flex and vibration issues galore, enough that I took the plunge and bought a reasonably priced solid frame. If you hook the FreeRadical to a strong frame you won't have any flex issues at all, and you can pick and choose what style of position you like. Also, a used FreeRadical can be found for a good price, that is how I acquired mine. Spent a few years with the daughter in the Yepp seat, but we just graduated to a Hooptie with some side runners this Christmas (no pictures of that setup yet, sorry)

Here are some links to pictures pre-hooptie:

https://plus.google.com/107169285990829634147/posts/Tq6P3RwdLjY

https://plus.google.com/107169285990829634147/posts/QLSJCsU7s2Z

Zach's comments remind me of one distinct drawback of the Trek Transport:  the kickstand.  In particular, the kickstand does not like a loaded bike where the load is off-balance, and does not do a good job of supporting the bike if the wind catches the bike.   

There have been a number of instances where the bike tipped when loaded, once with my son on board.  (He was obviously shaken, but OK.  I did a good job of hiding how shaken I was.) I am now very careful when I load the bike, and only buckle my son in when I am about to get on the bike myself.



Zach Roberts said:

I'll toss my support in for the FreeRadical and authentic Hooptie (and the over engineered but great kickback stand, for ease of loading kids). My 4 year old daughter and I roll around with this setup hooked to a Surly Karate Monkey, and we love the thing. I don't tow any Honda Civics, but 6 full grocery bags, a lightweight kid (31lbs) and her bike in tow, no problems.

I too was skeptical of the Kickback kickstand being worth 150$, and I struggled by with a hefty traditional kickstand for a year or two, but once I used a kickback, I am a convert. Especially with high center of gravity loads, like squirmy, dancing, singing kids in the Yepp seats. The ability to mount the bike while the stand is still stabilizing the load, and then just push forward to release is remarkably well thought out.

A little bird told me that Yuba might be coming out with something soon.  Or those things can always be made or modified.

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