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...."Why isn't daley sucking up to Schwinn to build a factory, do we need more stores to sell cheap crap?"

OK I was on another discussion and I'm wondering...

 

Is any one else bothered by the big deal made about wallmart coming to Chicago, when what we really need is GOOD long term jobs here....

 

Why isn't daley trying to bring back at least SOME manufacturing here? I mean with so many people unemployed the cost of labour MUST be down, I know Schwinn is nothing more than a name BUT there must be some companies that would be willing to try, also since the price of land is down....How about SRAM? they are headquartered here.

 

So are we just a bunch of blind sheep that want our kids to play with lead painted toys from China because they are a buck? Or is anyone willing to pay more to have a non lead painted toy?

 

Isn't there a big drywall company with offices here in Chicago ? Why did China drywall show up in the south east with mystery stuff in it that MAY be toxic ?

 

I just think it's time for a real change

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Just a 2 cent note...
that I agree that I expect to not see traditional manufacturing sectors return to central urban areas anytime in my lifetime. It is interesting to drive out of town on I-55, for example. You will quickly see what type of landscape manufacturing construction has chosen: Low density, very large land plots, edge of suburbia and exurbia, directly adjacent to interstate access points, etc.

My 2 cent note is just an thought & observation I've had. Could be slightly inaccurate, what do I know?!
Oh, but wait a minute!!! Where is that "build bikes in Detroit" guy when you need him from a while back! :) haha
I just looked at that discussion, Arrak I think one of our problems is your sign off about him...."haha"

If more people tried, maybe something would get done, I know I cant build a factory, I don't gots no education to do all the econimic background stuff, put together a proposal, chat with unions, or whatever is needed.

Yeah factories in the downtown area will never happen, but what about the already existing empty or under used buildings?

Then is what I'm hearing that we are only consumers that just buy crap from other places?


Arrak Thumrs said:
Oh, but wait a minute!!! Where is that "build bikes in Detroit" guy when you need him from a while back! :) haha
The advantage of a city for a retail store is residential population density, people like to shop near where they live. The city offers no such advantage to a factory. Most of the other things you mention are reasons why manufacturing would be advantageous for Chicago, and I agree with your points, but they aren't reasons why Chicago would be advantageous for manufacturing. Believe me, there's lots of unemployed folks everywhere right now.

I continue here because I'm not really so much opposed to your plan as much as I'm trying to understand what it is. I'm truly interested. When Daley goes to suck up to Schwinn and other large-scale manufacturers, what do you think he should be saying to them that says "here's why you want to be in the Chicago city limits as opposed to some other place in Illinois or the US"?

Rick norris said:
Well I think since Chicago is still in the USA I don't see it as two issues, I get what your saying about inside city limits. I guess I just don't understand how can a retail store can pay taxes and turn a profit why cant a factory?
Lamenting the loss of manufacturing jobs in Chicago is like waxing nostalgic about the times when barbers performed tooth extractions. However, if you insist that untold numbers of Chicagoans could benefit from such jobs why not take it upon yourself to make it happen? Any politician that claims to possess the power to create jobs by way of their public office is lying through their teeth. Only entrepreneurs can create jobs and no matter how many there are there will always be room for one more. Get to it.
In my opinion, Daley seems to want Chicago to be a "global city". He doesn't seem to care about factories or the working class. He wants tourists, students, McCormick conference visitors, and corporate-type workers from around the world.

An example of Daley not caring for the poor or working class residents is TIF projects. TIF projects displace the poor, not help them, and that's one of the biggest ways the neoliberal city works. If Daley really cared for the actual residents, there would be newly painted bike lanes along newly paved roads. Also, why was a "french market" built under Olgilvie when there are "food deserts" in Chicago? Because the city and the developer only see profit, which is neoliberalism.

Building a factory would only bring working class salaries. Daley wants high-end salaries and tourist money. Factories and infrastructure improvements would be a long-term plan. Wal-mart is a quick fix.

I think Chicago is a good city, but there are problems. And building a Wal-mart is one of them.
Rick norris said:
Yeah factories in the downtown area will never happen, but what about the already existing empty or under used buildings?
Some people are not just hoping the mayor will solve their problems by appealing to a big corporation, but exactly doing that.

Like Michael Perz said: entrepreneurs create jobs, not politicians
Rick norris said:
I just looked at that discussion, Arrak I think one of our problems is your sign off about him...."haha"

Oh, wait! Let me go through the Archives to find it. It was popcorn all the way...
HERE>> Detroit Thread
AND >> Retroit
I think Daley does, to some extent, want manufacturing jobs to move to Chicago. AFAIK, that's what the TIF industrial corridors are all about, specifically encouraging manufacturing (mostly light industry) in areas that aren't considered suitable for residential or retail development. They also offer job training, which leads to one problem with your proposal: many of the people who would have at one time been employed in manufacturing, have no relevant job skills to speak of. I think a valuable use of Chicago's money would be to offer vocational programs for non-college-track kids; as you rightly point out, not everyone is going to become a doctor, but that doesn't mean that they are unemployable.

Furthermore, there's no reason why working retail has to be shitty. My mom worked retail for the same company for almost 30 years-- they offered health insurance, a decent wage, and flexible scheduling and time off when my sister and I were little. They weren't even unionized, it was just a decent company to work for. Wal-Mart could be a good employer if they offered a living wage, health insurance, and advancement opportunities. Oh, and if they had avoided the whole sexist assholery bit. Since retail, by its very nature, can't be shipped out of the country, why not focus on the rights of current service industry workers?
I think the advantages are a little of the same from many years ago....

It is centrally located, we have lake access and train access for container shipping, we have large empty places that could be renovated, or ripped down to build new. There are a lot of people WILLING to work there is training availble from the city for machine shop type work (where these people are going to work now is beyond me)

But again I think I (ME, MYSELF) would push a LONG TERM HONEST TAX RATE, and not all kinds of teasers, I think I would push to get LONG TERM LIVABLE HONEST rates, concessions and protection from the unions. I would pass zone "buffers" to protect the factory....(You moved next to a factory and now you complain about traffic? ...sorry no help for you)

And again IF more jobs came here then the infrastructure would closely follow more bus routes, more bike lanes....

Believe me David, my lack of ability to get something like this done is frustrating, as much as I hate the guy I have to admit when he puts his mind to it daley gets things done. If he can sell Chicago to wallmart why not a manufacturer? Yeah getting wallmart here (or other retailers) is easy and fast but is it long term and good?


David said:
The advantage of a city for a retail store is residential population density, people like to shop near where they live. The city offers no such advantage to a factory. Most of the other things you mention are reasons why manufacturing would be advantageous for Chicago, and I agree with your points, but they aren't reasons why Chicago would be advantageous for manufacturing. Believe me, there's lots of unemployed folks everywhere right now.

I continue here because I'm not really so much opposed to your plan as much as I'm trying to understand what it is. I'm truly interested. When Daley goes to suck up to Schwinn and other large-scale manufacturers, what do you think he should be saying to them that says "here's why you want to be in the Chicago city limits as opposed to some other place in Illinois or the US"?

Rick norris said:
Well I think since Chicago is still in the USA I don't see it as two issues, I get what your saying about inside city limits. I guess I just don't understand how can a retail store can pay taxes and turn a profit why cant a factory? Yeah citys would have to make tax breaks that are long term and low but why not?
Is it better to be getting a buck or two than nothing?

The advantage a factory would have is that they would manufacture for export, bring outside money into the country, a store generally sells in it's own area (I am excluding nich type stores that may export throught the internet, or othwer ways)

As far as why Chicago..because I live here. There are already empty factory buidings in areas. On the west side I believe there are still ample RR spurs for freight. There are lots of un emplyed people in this city.

If more people worked (example) on the west side there would be a demand for public transportation, at some point the goons(sorry 'nother subject) our wonderfull city leaders would provide busses because those bus lines would be profitable.

If we go with the idea of manufacturing in far rural areas, then we become more car dependent to get people from the city to work. Because lets face it with out a big sidetrack discussion that is what will happen.
The idea, or I guess MY idea is to bring jobs to the masses, instead of moving the masses to the jobs.
Your linky is broken. Is this about that Chief Marketing Officer lady that got hired and fired at Walmart within six months or so? I remember reading that and thinking the sexual harassment was just an excuse. The real reason that the Walmart board realized that it was a mismatch of epic proportions and they needed to get rid of her. Hiring a fast moving ad executive at stodgy, cheapskate Walmart? What were they thinking?

heather stratton said:
I think Daley does, to some extent, want manufacturing jobs to move to Chicago. AFAIK, that's what the TIF industrial corridors are all about, specifically encouraging manufacturing (mostly light industry) in areas that aren't considered suitable for residential or retail development. They also offer job training, which leads to one problem with your proposal: many of the people who would have at one time been employed in manufacturing, have no relevant job skills to speak of. I think a valuable use of Chicago's money would be to offer vocational programs for non-college-track kids; as you rightly point out, not everyone is going to become a doctor, but that doesn't mean that they are unemployable.
Furthermore, there's no reason why working retail has to be shitty. My mom worked retail for the same company for almost 30 years-- they offered health insurance, a decent wage, and flexible scheduling and time off when my sister and I were little. They weren't even unionized, it was just a decent company to work for. Wal-Mart could be a good employer if they offered a living wage, health insurance, and advancement opportunities. Oh, and if they had avoided the whole sexist assholery bit. Since retail, by its very nature, can't be shipped out of the country, why not focus on the rights of current service industry workers?
Here is a brief primer on a topic you may find illuminating.

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