The Chainlink

So I have been reading on keeping the toes warm, I have a short commute, usually about ~20 minutes, but it is mostly on industrial roads and MUPs, and a short distance on Milwaukee.  So I am guessing I'll be riding in slush a lot since the curbs and roads aren't plowed very well in the winter.  There is a lot of info on what people have made worked, but there doesn't seem to be anyone who has just done one or the other.  

Or if there is a specific thread I missed, by all means link it and I apologize for missing it!

I currently have a pair of SPD pedals with a small platform on the other side.  I am finding that my feet are so cold they hurt, especially when they are wet.  I bought my cleats with a little extra room, and I own cold weather hiking socks.  Should I just invest in a waterproof shoe cover and forego the thermal stuff?  I saw the Rivendell MUSA covers and they look like great water proof options, but I am worried about them holding slush against my shoe when I put a foot down.

Otherwise I am thinking about switching my pedals to some platforms and riding in boots.  I have a set of Goretex lined boots that when worn with my wool cold weather socks, my feet always sweat. 

What has worked for others?  Do you really notice the loss in pedal stroke going from a cleat to a platform, especially in poor weather?

Views: 1692

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

P.S. I've got an extra set of gaiters if you want to try them out for a bit before buying them...

Jaik that would be awesome, do you know what size or they a one-fits-all kind of thing?

Jaik S. said:

P.S. I've got an extra set of gaiters if you want to try them out for a bit before buying them...

Look to the North, I say! Ice fisherfolk stay out drinking beer all night long on frozen lakes--what do they wear?

LaCrosse & Sorel make waterproof boots with thick wool felt inserts. The biggest, bite-ey-est platform pedals get a good grip on them and suddenly warm feet are no longer a worry. I rode LaCrosse for many winters. This year, I have a new pair of Sorels that go to my knees. I replaced the factory insert with the solid wool insert from my old LaCrosse, though, as I don't believe any synthetic thermal material can beat what the sheep have given us.

I use Stolen Thermalite pedals. (Stolen is the company that makes the pedals, not the method of acquisition). They are cheap, wide, and grippy, and they work well with Holdfast straps. They are great with any shoes that have a rubber sole. I haven't worn leather-soled shoes with them, and I probably wouldn't, due to the metal pins. Downside to these pedals is that their bearings aren't serviceable. 

Gaiters are usually one-size-fits-all.  I have knee high ones that I love for walking to the train when the snow gets deep - or for cross country skiing.

http://www.backcountry.com/gaiters?CMP_ID=PD_GOc001GN&mv_pc=r10...|pcrid|56152311982
 
Chitown_Mike said:

Jaik that would be awesome, do you know what size or they a one-fits-all kind of thing?

Jaik S. said:

P.S. I've got an extra set of gaiters if you want to try them out for a bit before buying them...

They're either Large or XL. I don't remember which one. I know I tried the mediums and they wouldn't fit. I'll let you know when I get home, what size they are.

Chitown_Mike said:

Jaik that would be awesome, do you know what size or they a one-fits-all kind of thing?

I have never used shoe covers. As a recumbent rider the bottom of my feet face forward into the wind which increases the cold. My current setup is stuffing my former Sorel wool lining into a yellow rubber overboot. Works great. Warm and dry.

Sounds like a practical solution for 'bent riding.
 
Gene Tenner said:

I have never used shoe covers. As a recumbent rider the bottom of my feet face forward into the wind which increases the cold. My current setup is stuffing my former Sorel wool lining into a yellow rubber overboot. Works great. Warm and dry.

That's all it is. It's not ideal for a lot of people, but for those who use it for what they are, toe covers work quite well in blocking the wind.

To me, the wind on top of the temperature is what makes my feet cold. Clipless shoes have vents up front. Toe covers help in blocking the wind, thus minimizing the cold without the bulk.

With that said, having a black-thick plastic bag between socks and shoes also worked well for me, but made it slippery inside my shoes.



rwein5 said:

i'll concede that they aren't ideal for high precipitation/slush sitations, but i'm also likely not riding a bike with clipless pedals at that point anyways.

I've used them and found them effective for that purpose, as long as it's not drenching moisture or deep slush.  Your mileage may vary...
 
rwein5 said:

Not toe - shoe covers. They actually stand a chance against precipitation. 

I have some cheap neopreme boot covers I wear over my cycling shoes. Very warm.

I opened up my winter storage...I've got the XL ones...but a buckle is missing on one. I'll see if I have spare buckles...I know Outdoor research has their lifetime warranty and would just replace them if I asked...

RSS

Groups

© 2008-2016   The Chainlink Community, L.L.C.   Powered by

Disclaimer  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service