The Chainlink

Gotta say, I don't like it for two reasons. It seems people who are getting into their cars use it as a sidewalk, and garbage tends to gather in the lane, especially around the Bloomer chocolate factory. I've ridden this a few times, and it's kinda sketchy. I think it was modeled after ones in Europe, but i don't think it's the best for Chicago. just saying.

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I rode the entire seperated stretch of Kinzie on my commute home last week and encountered two joggers, a wrong way cyclist and a car parked in the lane completely blocking it.   It was pretty much exactly what all the nay-sayers claimed would happen -- most people will not take it as a serious piece of transportation infrastructure and so they will use it as they please.  And since you're blocked in your little "protected" bike tunnel, you've lost room to maneuver.  Gee, thanks for making my ride less safe for the psychological comfort of a bunch of ninnies who hardly ride to begin with.

I fail to see how you cannot maneuver around a pedestrian when you have 7ft of space to share between you and the pedestrian.

 

Most of the time I have less space than that on the regular road. Yet somehow I manage to maneuver safely around tit.


envane x said:

I rode the entire seperated stretch of Kinzie on my commute home last week and encountered two joggers, a wrong way cyclist and a car parked in the lane completely blocking it.   It was pretty much exactly what all the nay-sayers claimed would happen -- most people will not take it as a serious piece of transportation infrastructure and so they will use it as they please.  And since you're blocked in your little "protected" bike tunnel, you've lost room to maneuver.  Gee, thanks for making my ride less safe for the psychological comfort of a bunch of ninnies who hardly ride to begin with.

These things are what it takes to move cycling from something in the domain of "daring 20 something men" to a common occurrence. You'll just have to deal with it. The cars and joggers are something that will take time to amend.

We agree, this is the first half-mile in a proposed 25-mile network this year! People will adjust.

 

If you are interested in spreading bikeways around Chicago, please consider signing on to our Neighborhood Bikeways Campaign.

 

Together we will mobilize people around the city to win more protected bikeways and double bike parking.

 

Thanks,

Ethan Spotts, Active Trans

 

Adam "Cezar" Jenkins said:

These things are what it takes to move cycling from something in the domain of "daring 20 something men" to a common occurrence. You'll just have to deal with it. The cars and joggers are something that will take time to amend.

Teething pains.

 

I was a nay-sayer and still feel these lanes are not for everywhere.  But there are places where they will become oft-used infrastructure.  In these places where it used to be areas that were unridable before to all but the most insane daredevils, they will eventually become  8-80-accessable corridors once the kinks get worked out.

 

When I see a salmon I yell SALMON! as I pass by half-jokingly and half-seriously.  Eventually they'll get the hint.  When there is a car idling in the bike lane I often stop and knock on the window and get their attention and say BIKE LANE! before riding off.  Eventually they'll get the hint too.  Joggers and people unloading trucks get the BIKE LANE! comment too as I ride by.   Hints will eventually sink in.  Then again I've never been accused of being too non-confrontational.

 

Things like garbage in the way is a city issue with regards to maintenance and upkeep.  I know it is a problem.  Overcrowding and slow pokes in the lanes is a bummer but at the same time is the fact that there are too many riders out there really such a bad thing?  If we fill up the bike lanes to over-flowing with bikes they'll realize that we are serious and have to build more -right?

 

I still don't think the protected lanes are necessary for many things outside of the loop except for some pinch points like bridges and underpasses.  Short protected corridors for those areas where it is just unsafe for us would be a boon IMHO.



Adam "Cezar" Jenkins said:
These things are what it takes to move cycling from something in the domain of "daring 20 something men" to a common occurrence. You'll just have to deal with it. The cars and joggers are something that will take time to amend.

The is nothing "daring" about riding a bike in the city. You just go out and do it and learn how. Why can't other people do this? I don't fucking care, just don't spent my tax money to cater to them and make my ride worse in the process.
I was kind of against them as well but, after my european trip, now I see a place for them. Riding in protected lanes is different than riding in the streets. Its much like riding on the lfp in that you will have diferent obsticals and will have to ride slower at times. It will take time to get used to them, and they are not for everywhere, but in the long run I think that they will be very benificial to cyclists. 

I have ridden it east from Milwaukee towards the loop every weekday since it opened (usually between 8:30 and 8:45).  I have yet to see a single pedestrian using the lane in an inappropriate manner.  Maybe I'm just lucky, but maneuvering in the protected lane hasn't been any more sketchy to me than any other marked bike lane in the city.  

 

I've only had three concerns, one of which is directly related to cyclist's conduct on Kinzie:  1) I have almost been right-hooked once or twice by cars making a right from Kinzie onto Jefferson.  This has created a pretty weird blindspot for cars that will likely need to be addressed better some time soon; 2) the timing of the light at Milwaukee turning left onto Kinize is absolutely horrible and needs to be fixed to increase safety; and 3) cyclists running the stop sign at Kinzie and Clinton under the viaduct.  I've seen a few cyclists almost get crushed by cars that were already turning left (and hence had the right of way) when the cyclist went through the intersection.  This was always a bit of a problem, but it seems to have increased with the protected lane a bit. 

 

I'm also interested to see how winter will be and whether the track will be plowed, but I'm not going to judge it on that fact until the City has a chance to act.  All in all, though, I think this lane has been a great addition to the City and wholly support it.    

Um . . . I don't, most of the time. Bump right into it ;)

Duppie said:

[. . .] somehow I manage to maneuver safely around tit.

Is this an excuse to repost for the billionth time that Casey Neistat video???

 

Nah!

The willingness of a person to ride a bike on a crowded city street mixed in with taxis and SUVs depends on many factors. If you are a young adult, strong, have great coordination, have experience maneuvering traffic as a driver, are generally not risk-averse, and have no dependents waiting for you to make it home safely, you're more likely to be riding Chicago's streets comfortably right now. For all the rest of us, I think bike lanes of all kinds, including protected lanes, are a good thing.

envane x said:


Adam "Cezar" Jenkins said:
These things are what it takes to move cycling from something in the domain of "daring 20 something men" to a common occurrence. You'll just have to deal with it. The cars and joggers are something that will take time to amend.

The is nothing "daring" about riding a bike in the city. You just go out and do it and learn how. Why can't other people do this? I don't fucking care, just don't spent my tax money to cater to them and make my ride worse in the process.

If riding in downtown traffic were so nothing then everyone would be doing it.  

 

Since they are not right now, there must be an issue with it. 

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