The Chainlink

bike parking hall of fame/hall of shame (was bike parking at stores, libraries and other major destinations)

I previously started this topic with a slightly different focus.  I'd like to keep the info we've already gathered and encourage you all to add more.  The goal is to collect data for a project I'm pursuing with a few folks to improve bike parking in the city.

Please post comments about Chicago businesses whose bike parking is either good (to say thanks) or needs improvement.  Include identifying information - name of business, address, and what is good or not so good about their bike parking

Photos are useful if you can get 'em.  If you have multiple businesses you'd like to mention, feel free.  They can be big chains (Jewel, Dominick's, Walgreens, Home Depot, etc.), franchises (hardware or fast food stores, for examples), or independent businesses.

If you talk to a store manager about the issue, tell us if you got any positive results.

Thanks for all your info!  It would be great if we can get better bike parking at the majority of stores and restaurants in bike-accessible locations in the next few years.  Your info can help make that possible.

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I've had an ongoing discussion with a few people about the lack of good bike parking at most grocery stores, drug stores, etc. 

County Fair (a family-owned independent) at 108th & Western has city racks out front.  Riding there to shop is a piece of cake.

Jewel and Dominick's stores typically have no racks at all or one rack installed so close to a wall that it can only be used by a few bikes, or one rack in a location where it's always surrounded by shopping carts - not bike friendly.  Walgreens stores near me have wheel bender racks similar to this

The nearest CVS has a city rack out front near the door, which is well used, but the one on their own property is so far from the flow of traffic and installed so close to the wall that it's never used. 


There's a new public library on 95th St. that opened less than a year ago.  It has a 10-bike rack near the front door.  Guess what?  It's installed so close to the wall nothing with wheels larger than 20" can be secured to it with a U-lock.  It usually has no more than 2 bikes locked to it, then people start locking to the nearby benches and fence. 


Meanwhile, another perfectly good 10-bike rack goes unused, because it's tucked away in the corner of the parking lot, out of sight from where most cyclists approach the library.


Which grocery store, pharmacy and library are your usual stops?  Do they have good bike parking?  Tell us about what's good or bad about the bike parking at these places or other frequent destinations.  Curious minds want to know.

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I'd like to point out a Flickr group called "Bad Bike Racks." It was started by a Victoria, B.C.-based bike parking expert named John Luton (I think I suggested he create it). I'm a "top contributor" of photos to the group.

Those who are Flickr-friendly should consider adding their own photos to the group. And Anne, take note of this repository for your campaign.
http://www.flickr.com/groups/867127@N24/pool/
Good point about people possibly missing the bike parking at Whole Foods at Roosevelt and Canal. I found it by seeing lots of cyclists going in and out of that garage level. I suspect that many others have also.

Please do share some pictures. I don't get to that location very often.

Steven Vance said:
I'm not sure all Whole Foods visitors know the bike parking is on the lower level of the parking garage. Because of the shadows the garage casts, it's hard to see the bike parking from the street so many bicyclists may be choosing to lock up on the sidewalk.

Anyway, awesome bike parking at Whole Foods Southgate Market. I need to get some photos of it.

Michael Perz said:
It may be worth mentioning that the Whole Foods on Canal just north of Roosevelt sports a fairly impressive array of bike racks beneath the parking deck. It also appears to be under camera surveillance.
Thanks for the link!

Steven Vance said:
I'd like to point out a Flickr group called "Bad Bike Racks." It was started by a Victoria, B.C.-based bike parking expert named John Luton (I think I suggested he create it). I'm a "top contributor" of photos to the group.

Those who are Flickr-friendly should consider adding their own photos to the group. And Anne, take note of this repository for your campaign.
http://www.flickr.com/groups/867127@N24/pool/
Geez, that's more bike parking than I've seen at many Home Depot stores, but they sure haven't made it useable.

Steven Vance said:
Does the Home Depot look anything like this?
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jamesbondsv/2801348101/

Todd Allen said:
Home Depot at Kimball and Addison has a 4 bike rack in a poor corner location which makes it only useable by 1 bike at a time. Except most of the time it can't be used at all because they use the area as their seasonal merchandise display spring, summer and fall and in the winter it is a place to store snow. I've complained repeatedly but now just park my bike in car parking spots.
I agree. If I go to Andersonville with more than a couple of people or on a busy night, it's a real challenge to find a decent place to lock up my bike.

Art Gilfand said:
Clark Street in Andersonville

A lot of people shop and live in the area (Carmen to Bryn Mawr) and bike parking is now at a premium. There are some bike racks, but not that many. When there were parking meters, the situation was tolerable.

The meters are gone and you now have to scramble to find an open bike rack on one of the side streets. I don't recall many (if any) bike racks on Clark Street itself, probably because the sidewalk is too narrow for specific bike parking. Maybe they could put bike racks on the street. At the very least a few more racks near some of the popular bars and coffee shops would be a good idea.
I'm not sure if that would fly since the city sold off its parking spaces. Portland has done what your talking about though. And as a side note their Zipcars are parked on the street. Of course Portland isn't really all that dense, probably equivalent density to bungalow belt neighborhoods.

Clark said:
Anne Alt said:
I agree. If I go to Andersonville with more than a couple of people or on a busy night, it's a real challenge to find a decent place to lock up my bike.
...Maybe they could put bike racks on the street....

Wow Anne! You bike Andersonville on a bike...when you live in Beverly? That's a dedicated cyclist!

But I LIKE the idea of taking over a couple of car-parking spaces right on Clark Street and installing bike racks. After all, a car parking spot allows 1.4 people to visit the merchants of Andersonville; an equivalent dedicated space fitted with bike racks would permit 14 people to visit and shop.
Certainly that 10:1 ratio could interest a few city planners....?

Reclaimed
I don't usually ride all the way to/from Andersonville. However, in combination with the red line, a trip to Andersonville works just fine.

I like the parking space idea. I think this could also be workable at some grocery and other stores where sidewalk space isn't always available.

Clark said:
Anne Alt said:
I agree. If I go to Andersonville with more than a couple of people or on a busy night, it's a real challenge to find a decent place to lock up my bike.
...Maybe they could put bike racks on the street....

Wow Anne! You bike Andersonville on a bike...when you live in Beverly? That's a dedicated cyclist!

But I LIKE the idea of taking over a couple of car-parking spaces right on Clark Street and installing bike racks. After all, a car parking spot allows 1.4 people to visit the merchants of Andersonville; an equivalent dedicated space fitted with bike racks would permit 14 people to visit and shop.
Certainly that 10:1 ratio could interest a few city planners....?
There are several bike racks west of the western-most spectator/pedestrian overpass. There are other bike racks scattered about on 35th Street. Sometimes with large destinations (like a gigantic stadium), bike parking (among other features) can be difficult to find.

Have you seen a specific need for more?
If so, request bike parking on the CDOT website.

Art Gilfand said:
From the hall of fame:
WRIGLEY FIELD - CHICAGO CUBS BIKE VALET.
Kudos. They moved the bike valet to the NE corner of Waveland and Clark. In addition, lots of bike racks around the ballpark.

At the facilty on 35th Street: Still looking for bike valet and more than a dozen bike racks.
Just put in a request for 4635 N. Elston (Village Discount). Really, the only thing to lock up to there is the parking lot gate.

Steven Vance said:
There are several bike racks west of the western-most spectator/pedestrian overpass. There are other bike racks scattered about on 35th Street. Sometimes with large destinations (like a gigantic stadium), bike parking (among other features) can be difficult to find.

Have you seen a specific need for more?
If so, request bike parking on the CDOT website.

Art Gilfand said:
From the hall of fame:
WRIGLEY FIELD - CHICAGO CUBS BIKE VALET.
Kudos. They moved the bike valet to the NE corner of Waveland and Clark. In addition, lots of bike racks around the ballpark.

At the facilty on 35th Street: Still looking for bike valet and more than a dozen bike racks.
Chicago's first green police station on 31st and Halsted has one bike rack and it's hidden in the parking lot. Why none in front of the station?!
This notice was attached to a rack on lincoln, near bryn mayr, the bike rack is now gone and there is a sidewalk cafe in it's place

The proliferation of sidewalk cafes is making it tougher for peds to walk down the sidewalks as well as costing us bike parking. *sigh*

Michael A said:
This notice was attached to a rack on lincoln, near bryn mayr, the bike rack is now gone and there is a sidewalk cafe in it's place

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