The Chainlink

I'm looking for some new pedals for my road/commuter bike.  Does anyone have any suggestions?  I'm looking for some half clipless/half platform, or some nice platform pedals with cages.  Thoughts/Ideas/Suggestions?

Views: 612

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

performance has these on sale

http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1033468_-1...

spd on one side, and a normal platform on the other
I've always been enamored with the MKS quick release pedals for this reason. Fully interchangeable platform and clipless pedals and really quick/easy to swap. That said, I've never put aside the money for a set. (MKS AR-2 EZY, MKS MM Cube Clipless, MKS AR-2 EZY Pedal Adaptors )
here is my set up on my everyday commuter ...

that is if your rolling fixed. The biggest advantage is its a 70.00 set up that woks with any and all shoes.
Interesting-- I guess I'd need to see them in situ; something about the white plastic reminds me of adaptive equipment for convalescents (not that there's anything wrong with that ;-)

wig [ isaac ] said:
here is my set up on my everyday commuter ...

that is if your rolling fixed. The biggest advantage is its a 70.00 set up that woks with any and all shoes.
I way haven't been keeping up but it used to be that Performance's SPD system was a bit proprietary and was hit-or-miss with Ritchey/Wellgo/Shimano cleats. Has this changed/improved?

Michael A said:
performance has these on sale

http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1033468_-1...

spd on one side, and a normal platform on the other
Shimano PD-A530s single-sided SPDs
Clark said:
For a commuter bike, I'd forgo the fancy clipless system and just go with platform pedals ($13). If you subsequently decided you'd need them, mini-toe clips could be added for another $6.

The reason I say this is that with all the traffic, potholes, pedestrians and other hazards in the city, you surely don't want to be distracted by clipping in and out at every stop...just for a bit more pedaling efficiency that a clipless pedal might provide...if your pedaling technique is correct, that is. I think you'd find single-sided pedals an unnecessary distraction and expense too.

Clipless also requires special expensive and generally stupid looking shoes. Why force yourself to carry around an extra pair of shoes just so you can ride your bike to work? Biking is fun and it does not have to require a ton of rigmarole, expense or clown suits.

Once off the bike, hobbling around like a wounded puppet in tap shoes conveys an image to non-riders that biking is troublesome.
For my city/commuter I have the MKS lambdas:


I like the freedom of using whatever shoes I have on.

For my touring bike, I have the Shimano PD-M324s:


Both work well for their respective purposes.
I like these:


heavy but cheep and your feet won't slip.
Wow, these opinions against clipless pedals seem on the surface to be rather ill-informed.

I have Shimano SPD pedals on all four of my bikes. I've yet to hobble around like a wounded puppet as I don't use my road shoes for anything but road riding, hence, I also don't need to carry around another set of shoes unless I'm commuting to work. I have mountain bike shoes with treads that recess my cleats. I have two sets of Shimano cycling sandals that also recess the cleats and are as comfortable to wear as Tevas. In a few weeks time I'll be getting a set of Keen cycling sandals that once again have treads that will recess the cleats on the sole. I dare say the layman cannot tell the difference between a set of Keen sandals and Keen cycling sandals.

Potholes, people, cars, hazards on the road are "distractions to clipping in and out"? You gotta be kidding me. Three of my bikes have double sided clipless pedals, clipping in is as simple as stepping on a platform pedal. Oh, but what about coming to a stop? Simple, twist out and leave the toe engaged and if that sounds like work, over 20 years of repetition becomes habit forming to the point of not even noticing. One bike has single sided clipless pedals and once again, due to repetition, I can clip in fairly rapidly without problem.

Generally stupid looking and expensive shoes. I could say that about helmets too but I would submit holders of that opinion of bike shoes should be asked, "So? Is anyone forcing you to wear those shoes and have you actually looked in the marketplace at said shoes anytime recently?"

My point here is not push Wesley towards step in pedals but rather to counter some of the opinions presented. Like anything, step in and platform pedals have pros and cons but the cons of step-ins are not nearly as big as the detractors would have everyone believe. If anything I would recommend a design endorsed by Michael A.

Tony Adams said:
Clark said:
For a commuter bike, I'd forgo the fancy clipless system and just go with platform pedals ($13). If you subsequently decided you'd need them, mini-toe clips could be added for another $6.

The reason I say this is that with all the traffic, potholes, pedestrians and other hazards in the city, you surely don't want to be distracted by clipping in and out at every stop...just for a bit more pedaling efficiency that a clipless pedal might provide...if your pedaling technique is correct, that is. I think you'd find single-sided pedals an unnecessary distraction and expense too.

Clipless also requires special expensive and generally stupid looking shoes. Why force yourself to carry around an extra pair of shoes just so you can ride your bike to work? Biking is fun and it does not have to require a ton of rigmarole, expense or clown suits.

Once off the bike, hobbling around like a wounded puppet in tap shoes conveys an image to non-riders that biking is troublesome.
I cross 39 traffic lights on my daily ride to work. Usually 10-12 of them will be red and I do stop for everyone of them. The repeated clipping in and out got tired really quick and after a few months I went back to the setup Clark describes on one of my bikes. Cheap, durable and I don't have to think about the shoes I am wearing when hopping on the bike.
On my winter bike I have platform pedals, nothing else.

It also depends on your riding style: are you of the inclination that every ride is a training ride and you have to work on form and pedal stroke? Then clipless might be worth trying. If you are more of a casual rider, I would stay away from it.

Lastly, take all opinions (including mine) with a grain of salt. Discussions about pedals fall into the categories of wearing helmets or not. It can create heated debate, based more on personal opinion than fact.

Clark said:
For a commuter bike, I'd forgo the fancy clipless system and just go with platform pedals ($13). If you subsequently decided you'd need them, mini-toe clips could be added for another $6.

The reason I say this is that with all the traffic, potholes, pedestrians and other hazards in the city, you surely don't want to be distracted by clipping in and out at every stop...just for a bit more pedaling efficiency that a clipless pedal might provide...if your pedaling technique is correct, that is. I think you'd find single-sided pedals an unnecessary distraction and expense too.
I am also surprised by the comments against clipless pedals. I have spds on two bikes and toe clips on the other, and I find the toe clips to be more trouble than clipping in, which as craig s said is basically the same as setting your foot down on a platform. As for the OP question, I used the double-sided clipless/ platform for about 2 months, and I did not like it. The spd aide was heavier, I think, so when I wanted to ride on that side I was always having to flip the pedal over. I realize that doesn't sound that bad, but I found it annoying.

RSS

© 2008-2016   The Chainlink Community, L.L.C.   Powered by

Disclaimer  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service