The Chainlink

Nice first ride in the COLD.

 

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You missed the paragraph above that that says that parking is automatically banned on 107 miles of vital arterial streets when there is 2" or more of snow.  That includes Milwaukee, which is almost always pretty clear right away.  Getting to Milwaukee is usually the issue, as it was today, which is (to get this thread back on track :-)) why I did NOT ride today. 
 
T.K. 8.4 mi said:

Adam, from cityofchicago.gov (bold is mine):http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/streets/provdrs/street/s...

"A separate snow related parking ban exists for another 500 miles of main streets and can be activated after there are at least two inches of snow on the street. While the 2” snow inch ban is not activated often, motorists who are parked there when it is could receive a ticket or find that their vehicle has been relocated in order to facilitate snow clearing operations.

Both of these parking bans were implemented on designated arterial streets to prevent recurrences of problems that happened in 1967 and 1979 when Chicago came to a traffic standstill due to major snowstorms."

The 2" of snow isn't the activator of the ban, the city is. 

Ride today was really fun and slow except for one left turn I had to make in heavy moving traffic and slippery roads.

Chicago has two types of "Snow" bans.   The most important roads ban overnight parking during the winter.   Period.   Even if it is 70 and sunny, no overnight parking.    The other roads CAN have a ban imposed if the snow is more than 2 inches deep.  But the City just about never invokes this ban.  Further complicating this, the ban can only be invoked on those streets which have signs in the block as well.  And MANY of these signs have not been replaced when lost or destroyed.  In my area, for example, Damen is a 2 inch snow route, but the signs are missing in most blocks.  



Lisa Curcio 4.1 mi said:

You missed the paragraph above that that says that parking is automatically banned on 107 miles of vital arterial streets when there is 2" or more of snow.  That includes Milwaukee, which is almost always pretty clear right away.  Getting to Milwaukee is usually the issue, as it was today, which is (to get this thread back on track :-)) why I did NOT ride today. 
 
T.K. 8.4 mi said:

Adam, from cityofchicago.gov (bold is mine):http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/streets/provdrs/street/s...

"A separate snow related parking ban exists for another 500 miles of main streets and can be activated after there are at least two inches of snow on the street. While the 2” snow inch ban is not activated often, motorists who are parked there when it is could receive a ticket or find that their vehicle has been relocated in order to facilitate snow clearing operations.

Both of these parking bans were implemented on designated arterial streets to prevent recurrences of problems that happened in 1967 and 1979 when Chicago came to a traffic standstill due to major snowstorms."

The 2" of snow isn't the activator of the ban, the city is. 

Ride today was really fun and slow except for one left turn I had to make in heavy moving traffic and slippery roads.

Thanks for the clarification, Lisa. Here is the map of the permanent overnight parking ban: http://www.cityofchicago.org/content/dam/city/depts/streets/supp_in...

It doesnt look very helpful for bike folks, since a lot of them are riding north and east of Milwaukee and Kedzie, and/or wont have clear access to those streets like you said. Ok I'll stop derailing now. :) 

Lisa Curcio 4.1 mi said:

You missed the paragraph above that that says that parking is automatically banned on 107 miles of vital arterial streets when there is 2" or more of snow.

I bussed to job 1 and divvy'd to job 2. The roads are clear, bike lanes mostly clear, side streets are a mess. The sun is out and I was overdressed. 

If I lived close to the loop I would have given it a go. Major arteries in the city were ok but not  ideal. Suburban streets were difficult for all users. If I had ridden I would have had to portage two blocks to get to a plowed street. There was a half foot on the street and driving to the train was no snap. I have no regret about bailing. 

Although the city is better for riding major streets right after a storm, it is inferior once you get to the capillaries. Most suburban communities enforce alternate side parking allowing the minor streets to be clean within a couple days. In the city the minor streets are difficult until the snow melts. My street, unrideable and virtually undriveable this morning, will be fine by tomorrow. Neighborhood streets in the city will still have buried vehicles and a center trough for a while. This isn't a better/worse opinion. It just is what it is. 

The last two mornings have been fairly brutal with my fingers and toes getting numb. My core and legs were warm for the most part until I got to the Loop and got stopped at every red light on Dearborn. Still better than walking to the 'L' and filing into a packed train. It's nice to stay active though the winter.

I agree. I was thinking the same thing as I was passing all the people lined up for the bus stops on my ride this morning. 

Adam, you might want to check out www.refrigiwear.com for some cheap gear for these bitterly cold days. They have some gloves comfort-rated to -20 degrees for only $20. 

Adam Herstein (5.5 mi) said:

Still better than walking to the 'L' and filing into a packed train. It's nice to stay active though the winter.

Why am I riding so slow? I almost never get out of third gear in this cold weather. Is it me, my bike, cold air, breaqthing through a balaclava, the chain, heavy clothes or something else? Brrr. Grrr.

Yeah, it was cold out there. But @adam you're right - still beats the CTA.

I don't know about you, but I find that my breathing efficiency has gone down in the cold weather. I thought it might be the balaclava, but even after pulling it down, I'm huffing at points where I really shouldn't be, given my current conditioning. I don't know why that would be; I'd speculate it's a quasi-asthmatic effect from the lungs contracting a bit from the cold. But I'm not a doctor or scientist or anything.
 
Gene Tenner said:

Why am I riding so slow? I almost never get out of third gear in this cold weather. Is it me, my bike, cold air, breaqthing through a balaclava, the chain, heavy clothes or something else? Brrr. Grrr.

the cold weather will defiantly have an effect on your breathing, It is almost impossible to get in a workout for me outdoors at this temp, so I just ride at a much slower pace only pushing harder to regulate my temp

I know there is some scientific reason for it. It must have something to do with the amount of oxygen getting to muscles, because I am downshifting at the slightest incline and still feel as though I am pedaling through molasses.  And 20 degrees make me feel like a speed demon, which is pretty funny given my normal slow riding. 
 
Gene Tenner said:

Why am I riding so slow? I almost never get out of third gear in this cold weather. Is it me, my bike, cold air, breaqthing through a balaclava, the chain, heavy clothes or something else? Brrr. Grrr.

 

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