The Chainlink

Hey you.... out there in the cold.... are you on Chainlink?

Kind of missing a "who did you see on your commute" today but for people you are not able to identify.  So here goes. I know you nord' sidersss are swimming in random strangers on bikes, but where I live it's not quite a daily occurrence to see another cyclist on my way to/from work.

Views: 2705

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I felt pretty lonely today.  Only one or two this morning and one fellow who passed me on the way home.(And very politely said "on your left", which I appreciated.)  Where is everybody???????

holiday travelling.  I'm here but didn't leave the house.

I ride m-f from the north side. I take sheridan to broadway to clark and work at the new balance store on the corner of clark and fullerton. I where black spandex with a high viz strip down the side, a black jacket with high viz on it, a livestrong black and yellow helmet. then i have a green chrone bag on my back that has my army patches and pins from being in the army. bike is an old school blue peugot with red rims and fixed

But see you tomorrow at Pecking Order! ;-)

Julie Hochstadter said:

holiday travelling.  I'm here but didn't leave the house.

I try to talk to every cyclist I stop next to @ stoplights and such.  Had a great convo with a guy who tested lab rats to find a cure for schizophrenia @ the lake front trail.

I stick out, beard + long hair + leather jacket with a lime green hat and lime green valve stem light on the rear wheel.  On a road bike almost always on the drops moving swiftly... and I'm anywhere between 50 north pulaski - the lake front trail - rainbow beach - Englewood - and the south burbs Matteson/Homewood.

If that guy can find a cure for schizophrenia at the lake front trail there are thousands of cyclists who will probably be willing to help fund his research and be eternally grateful!  :D

Mark Potts said:

. . . . Had a great convo with a guy who tested lab rats to find a cure for schizophrenia @ the lake front trail.


On clear mornings M-F I take the path south from Hollywood beach all the way to Monroe. Take that west to Michigan Ave going south then right on Van Buren.

Going home, I always take Franklin up - turns into Orleans, left a bit on Division and immediate right on Sedgwick until Lincoln. Then I take Lincoln up to Southport to Clark all the way north to Edgewater.

This last one in reverse is also my route to the loop if it's really windy and I don't feel like taking LFP.

I ride a GS scooter with my hair cut neat.

I wear my wartime coat in the wind and sleet.

Mark Potts said:


I stick out, beard + long hair + leather jacket with a lime green hat and lime green valve stem light on the rear wheel.  On a road bike almost always on the drops moving swiftly... and I'm anywhere between 50 north pulaski - the lake front trail - rainbow beach - Englewood - and the south burbs Matteson/Homewood.

Is your Jacket gonna be cut slim and checked,

with maybe a touch of searsucker and an open neck?

h' said:

I ride a GS scooter with my hair cut neat.

I wear my wartime coat in the wind and sleet.

Mark Potts said:


I stick out, beard + long hair + leather jacket with a lime green hat and lime green valve stem light on the rear wheel.  On a road bike almost always on the drops moving swiftly... and I'm anywhere between 50 north pulaski - the lake front trail - rainbow beach - Englewood - and the south burbs Matteson/Homewood.

One curious conclusion to this discussion was that there is a possibility that "mental disease" is actually normal human behavior categorized.  That is, perhaps its not so much that those with mental disorders *can't* think reasonably, it is rather they *choose not to* think reasonably - forming concrete reasoning for being unreasonable.

Lisa Curcio said:

If that guy can find a cure for schizophrenia at the lake front trail there are thousands of cyclists who will probably be willing to help fund his research and be eternally grateful!  :D

Mark Potts said:

. . . . Had a great convo with a guy who tested lab rats to find a cure for schizophrenia @ the lake front trail.


If this is even close to what the guy said, then I have to conclude he was yanking your chain in regard to who he is and what he does.

Mark Potts said:

One curious conclusion to this discussion was that there is a possibility that "mental disease" is actually normal human behavior categorized.  That is, perhaps its not so much that those with mental disorders *can't* think reasonably, it is rather they *choose not to* think reasonably - forming concrete reasoning for being unreasonable.

Lisa Curcio said:

If that guy can find a cure for schizophrenia at the lake front trail there are thousands of cyclists who will probably be willing to help fund his research and be eternally grateful!  :D

Mark Potts said:

. . . . Had a great convo with a guy who tested lab rats to find a cure for schizophrenia @ the lake front trail.


"Scientists think interactions between genes and the environment are necessary for schizophrenia to develop. Many environmental factors may be involved, such as exposure to viruses or malnutrition before birth, problems during birth, and other not yet known psychosocial factors.

Scientists are learning more about brain chemistry and its link to schizophrenia."


The guy said that, almost exactly.  What I expanded upon, and we discussed at the time, was "not yet known psychosocial factors".  Key is that social factors are absolutely to play - *how* is to debate, but this and many other "mental disorders" are closely linked with society's influence.

One possible explanation is the "special person" effect... whereby an individual may do a horrible job, or perhaps not even complete the job, and be rewarded greatly.  Is something "wrong" with them?  Or are they purposefully not trying because that is exactly what gets them hugs/smiles/money.  Clearly some people are born below mean mental capacity (down syndrome is a good example)- but there are absolutely cases where those individuals who may have simply had to try a bit harder to succeed at a "normal" level do not try at all because they are rewarded by their social support system for what is truly failure.

We can also figure the effect of many drugs prescribed (or not) that individuals take on a regular basis.... ever seen someone on Adavan?  Marijuana?  Paxil?  Now imagine growing up in a social support structure that favors the use of such things to cure problems.  How can we even begin to determine what a personality would have been if since 4 years old they have been popping pills/etc to control their minds/bodies - drugs that have powerful negative effects and questionable/absent positive effects.


 What we have to consider is *our* role in the development of all of those who surround us.  Can we seriously expect intelligence from someone who spends the majority of the years in which their bodies and minds are forming watching tv/playing video games... who grows into a person who does the same exact thing at the same exact place for 8-10 hours every single day and then sits watching sitcom reruns from the "good ole days"?  Is this individual fit to advise a young mind, help it grow and flourish?  The reality is this is the sort of person who ignores their child while a screen feeds them useless information - this is the sort of person that drugs their kids so they can stop yelling "sit down and shut up!" - this is the person who eats to obesity terrible terrible foods that create sickness, and feeds the child a similar diet - this scenario accounts for MILLIONS of people - some I know personally, and they feel totally justified in their actions!  This is just one possible way in which social support systems form a baby who had as much potential as any great person into someone with a "mental disorder".

We are not all born the same, but there are deeper reasons as to why more and more people have disorder/disease... the choices the majority of people make on a day to day basis undoubtedly play a part - likely a significant one.

h' said:

If this is even close to what the guy said, then I have to conclude he was yanking your chain in regard to who he is and what he does.

Mark Potts said:

One curious conclusion to this discussion was that there is a possibility that "mental disease" is actually normal human behavior categorized.  That is, perhaps its not so much that those with mental disorders *can't* think reasonably, it is rather they *choose not to* think reasonably - forming concrete reasoning for being unreasonable.

RSS

Groups

© 2008-2016   The Chainlink Community, L.L.C.   Powered by

Disclaimer  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service