The Chainlink

Hi Chainlinkers,

I fabricated a bike chain about a month ago for my 29" mountain bike because my Ulock wouldn't fit it, I already had a padlock, and I didn't want to dish out the money for one of those expensive Onguard locks.  I feel like I came up with a pretty good design and I wanted to see if people would be interested in buying them.  

The chain is 6600 lb, zinc coated hardened steel tow chain---pretty tough stuff.  The chain length is approximately 4' 

It has a rubberized, flexible sleeve around it which protects your bike and your shoulder well (the easiest way I've found is to carry it over the shoulder).  The rubber material makes it easy to clean too.  If I make more of these, I'll cut the sleeve longer so that only a link or so is showing on either side.  Comes in one color (for now) super sexy blue!

The lock seen in the pictures is just a lock I had.  If I make them I will include a shielded shackle type lock like this: http://www.amazon.com/Master-Lock-40KADPF-Shielded-Stainless/dp/B00...

As you can see in the pictures, the lock will lock up both wheels and frame on my 27" rim road bike.  There's about 18.5" between the rims.  If the gap on your bike is much greater than this, you probably won't be able to lock up both rims at once, but it will still secure one rim and frame.

Let me know what you think, suggestions are appreciated! if I get 15 people that want one, I will make a first run batch.  The cost for each will be $50.  If you want a 3' chain, I'll sell those for $45. Thanks!

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50 bucks for a chain that is easy to cut with bolt cutters?

Thanks nut no thanks...

Do some more research on the chains that are out there and why they, and their locks, cost as much as they do.  Link shape, hardening process and specific alloy all have a lot to do with how hard a chain link is to cut.  The chain you are using is not hard to cut with bolt cutters compared to the stuff lock companies sell because it is meant to be strong in a different manner.

A Kryptonite chain and lock' both harder to defeat than what you are trying to sell retails for $90 or under; the extra security is worth the extra forty bucks.

You're right; I was thinking of Gr 40 not Gr 70 transport.  The Gr 70 will be very hard to cut without monster bolt cutters.

It still cuts easier than the bike lock specific ones.

kiltedcelt said:

Just so you know DUG - that chain he's talking about cannot be cut with bolt cutters, unless you're talking about cutters with arms three feet long. I worked at Home Depot for 7 years in the hardware department where we used a hydraulic pump jack cutter to cut chain. That 6600# tow chain stuff is the single hardest chain they sell. The only way to cut it is to cut the link on both sides, and believe me, when you're using a hydraulic cutter that puts out several THOUSAND pounds of cutting force and you still have to strain to get the arm moving, then that's tough chain. So, I don't think the average thief is going to be packing bolt cutters big enough to cut the chain. However, I do think that he's reinventing the wheel here. Any of the heavy bike chains - Kryptonite, Onguard, etc. is going to be a much better alternative due to the odd shape of the links, durability of the nylon sleeves, quality of the lock etc. If I was going to put $50 towards a chain lock set up, I'd go with one of those bike-specific brands. He made himself a nice stout chain that would be extremely difficult to cut with bolt cutters, but would do bugger-all against a grinder, but then again neither would any other bike-specific chain lock. Bolt cutters are being used on cables and cheapo 1/4" chains, not 3/8" heavy tow chains.

I've used a Kryptonite large U-lock with a cable for the back wheel for 20+ years of riding (4+ years of all-year-round riding) and (knock wood) never had a problem.  I always lock to something solid and whenever possible something within sight of where I happen to be (except at work, of course, and at home, when the bike is inside the apartment).  Whatever one pays for a lock or security is worth it, but you don't have to go all high-tech.  Ponder it in terms of how long a good lock can help you keep your bike from being stolen; the expense, amortized over years, gets less each year.  The up-front might seem like a lot, but it pays off in the long run.

Yes, I imagine it would probably take at least a 36" pair of bolt cutters or an abrasive wheel to cut this stuff, and either of those can get through about anything on the market.  The thing that I've liked about it over the brand name locks is the rubber sleeve. Being rubberized, rather than nylon fabric, it doesn't absorb water or grease and is easy to clean.  So in my eyes, that's an improvement over the other chain systems out there.  Thanks for the comments!

Are you still selling the lock?

If I get some takers, thanks for your interest!

If you loosen the nuts on both wheels, you can lift the frame right off.

No you can't

Gene Tenner said:

If you loosen the nuts on both wheels, you can lift the frame right off.

You could simply go through the frame, right above the pedals (sorry, I don't know what that area is called) before going to the front/rear tire.

Just a thought.

 

 

Respectfully,

 

Manny FU

Gene Tenner said:

If you loosen the nuts on both wheels, you can lift the frame right off.

wow! nice chain. I do recall when I was young back in the 1990's riding around the city with my 20 pounds of chain to lock up 17 pounds of bike. have look at come of my older flickr photos I  have been making covers for about 10 years now. I can give you patterns and the tricks so the cover will last more then a year.

Hey can you message me a few tips on making a flexible sheath I'm tryin to cover the chain of handcuffs basically but it's a 4ft long chain for my lock haha

wig [ isaac ] said:

wow! nice chain. I do recall when I was young back in the 1990's riding around the city with my 20 pounds of chain to lock up 17 pounds of bike. have look at come of my older flickr photos I  have been making covers for about 10 years now. I can give you patterns and the tricks so the cover will last more then a year.

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