The Chainlink

I looked for this frame on Craigslist for three years before finding it. Sadly last summer it cracked at the bottom bracket.

If you are a welder, or know one who might be interested in giving this a repair - let me know.

Could use a good home.

http://chicago.craigslist.org/chc/bik/4880474923.html

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Could you post a pic of the crack?

I'm sure Owen at Blue City Cycles could fix this.  The Craigslist ad shows that the crack IS NOT THE BOTTOM BRACKET but the seat tube.  So a good frame builder could put in a new seat tube.  It looks like he might be able to chop the the tube below the seat lug and then clean out what metal remains from the seat tube with a rotary tool.

Done deal.  Good as new.

Mark - check out the craigslist ad

http://images.craigslist.org/00O0O_h8XXOcT9Gwv_600x450.jpg



mark stetson said:

Could you post a pic of the crack?

Matt - I actually did consult Owen before I decided to part ways with the bike. He's done some welding for me before and I endorse his work wholeheartedly.

In this case, the cost to repair outweighed my sentimental value for the bike.

Matt M. 18.5KM said:

I'm sure Owen at Blue City Cycles could fix this.  The Craigslist ad shows that the crack IS NOT THE BOTTOM BRACKET but the seat tube.  So a good frame builder could put in a new seat tube.  It looks like he might be able to chop the the tube below the seat lug and then clean out what metal remains from the seat tube with a rotary tool.

Done deal.  Good as new.

Awesome. I shot him an email last night. The lugs would have to be braced in a jig during brazing to keep the frame together, and it's possible you'd need new lugs altogether.

David Pulsipher said:

Matt - I actually did consult Owen before I decided to part ways with the bike. He's done some welding for me before and I endorse his work wholeheartedly.

In this case, the cost to repair outweighed my sentimental value for the bike.

Matt M. 18.5KM said:

I'm sure Owen at Blue City Cycles could fix this.  The Craigslist ad shows that the crack IS NOT THE BOTTOM BRACKET but the seat tube.  So a good frame builder could put in a new seat tube.  It looks like he might be able to chop the the tube below the seat lug and then clean out what metal remains from the seat tube with a rotary tool.

Done deal.  Good as new.

It could be fixed but I doubt it would be worth it to have it done properly.  That is a lot of labor to save that frame when there are plenty of new options out there.

Also, it needs to have a tube replaced, not to be welded.  There is a HUGE difference in those two things.

Do a crappy job welding it. Make a shop stool.


ugh.  Maybe.


John said:

Do a crappy job welding it. Make a shop stool.

Seat lug and crank case, that is....but if the pictures are an accurate representation, this looks like it was strictly a failure of the seat tube.  It's fairly obvious that repeated stress over 30 years and perhaps some corrosion caused the failure since the split around the connection to the crank case is extremely precise.

I'm not certain how the rebrazed parts would fare, and the grinding out of the seat tube from the crank case and seat lug would have to be delicate and fit the new tube perfectly.  As I said before, some frame building tools would be involved, and the frame would need to stay in complete alignment.

What was the spec for the tubing?  4130?  True Temper?  The Trek 620 was Reynolds 531 tubing.

Matt M. 18.5KM said:

Awesome. I shot him an email last night. The lugs would have to be braced in a jig during brazing to keep the frame together, and it's possible you'd need new lugs altogether.

David Pulsipher said:

Matt - I actually did consult Owen before I decided to part ways with the bike. He's done some welding for me before and I endorse his work wholeheartedly.

In this case, the cost to repair outweighed my sentimental value for the bike.

Matt M. 18.5KM said:

I'm sure Owen at Blue City Cycles could fix this.  The Craigslist ad shows that the crack IS NOT THE BOTTOM BRACKET but the seat tube.  So a good frame builder could put in a new seat tube.  It looks like he might be able to chop the the tube below the seat lug and then clean out what metal remains from the seat tube with a rotary tool.

Done deal.  Good as new.

Matt - the one picture I forgot to take - what a rookie move!

It's Reynolds 501

Let me know if you have any other questions.


Matt M. 18.5KM said:

Seat lug and crank case, that is....but if the pictures are an accurate representation, this looks like it was strictly a failure of the seat tube.  It's fairly obvious that repeated stress over 30 years and perhaps some corrosion caused the failure since the split around the connection to the crank case is extremely precise.

I'm not certain how the rebrazed parts would fare, and the grinding out of the seat tube from the crank case and seat lug would have to be delicate and fit the new tube perfectly.  As I said before, some frame building tools would be involved, and the frame would need to stay in complete alignment.

What was the spec for the tubing?  4130?  True Temper?  The Trek 620 was Reynolds 531 tubing.

Matt M. 18.5KM said:

Awesome. I shot him an email last night. The lugs would have to be braced in a jig during brazing to keep the frame together, and it's possible you'd need new lugs altogether.

David Pulsipher said:

Matt - I actually did consult Owen before I decided to part ways with the bike. He's done some welding for me before and I endorse his work wholeheartedly.

In this case, the cost to repair outweighed my sentimental value for the bike.

Matt M. 18.5KM said:

I'm sure Owen at Blue City Cycles could fix this.  The Craigslist ad shows that the crack IS NOT THE BOTTOM BRACKET but the seat tube.  So a good frame builder could put in a new seat tube.  It looks like he might be able to chop the the tube below the seat lug and then clean out what metal remains from the seat tube with a rotary tool.

Done deal.  Good as new.

Well... I like challenges.  So I came up with this today - Bronze brazing rod melts at 1500°F-2000°F and Silver brazing rod melts at 1145°F.  To avoid movement and weakening the Reynolds 501 steel tubing, silver brazing rod can be used to replace the seat tube.  I'm pretty sure the original brazing material on the Trek 520 would have been bronze, but you wouldn't know for sure until you removed the paint on the bottom bracket and the seat lug......


David Pulsipher said:

Matt - the one picture I forgot to take - what a rookie move!

It's Reynolds 501

Let me know if you have any other questions.


Matt M. 18.5KM said:

Seat lug and crank case, that is....but if the pictures are an accurate representation, this looks like it was strictly a failure of the seat tube.  It's fairly obvious that repeated stress over 30 years and perhaps some corrosion caused the failure since the split around the connection to the crank case is extremely precise.

I'm not certain how the rebrazed parts would fare, and the grinding out of the seat tube from the crank case and seat lug would have to be delicate and fit the new tube perfectly.  As I said before, some frame building tools would be involved, and the frame would need to stay in complete alignment.

What was the spec for the tubing?  4130?  True Temper?  The Trek 620 was Reynolds 531 tubing.

Matt M. 18.5KM said:

Awesome. I shot him an email last night. The lugs would have to be braced in a jig during brazing to keep the frame together, and it's possible you'd need new lugs altogether.

David Pulsipher said:

Matt - I actually did consult Owen before I decided to part ways with the bike. He's done some welding for me before and I endorse his work wholeheartedly.

In this case, the cost to repair outweighed my sentimental value for the bike.

Matt M. 18.5KM said:

I'm sure Owen at Blue City Cycles could fix this.  The Craigslist ad shows that the crack IS NOT THE BOTTOM BRACKET but the seat tube.  So a good frame builder could put in a new seat tube.  It looks like he might be able to chop the the tube below the seat lug and then clean out what metal remains from the seat tube with a rotary tool.

Done deal.  Good as new.

http://rouleur.cc/journal/bicycles/tales-workshop-bicycle-euthanasia

Georgena Terry relates to your situation. Too many bikes are being put aside.

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