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I'm trying to find a little bit of background on this statement from the Illinois Bicycling Rules of the Road pamphlet (page 4):
When riding your bicycle on Illinois roadways, you must obey the same traffic laws, signs and signals that apply to motorists.

I'd like to understand the law (and its origins) behind this statement. I tried hunting it down online. I think I'm looking for Illinois Public Act 82-1032, but only found references which turned out to be dead ends. It appears that not all IL Public Acts are online. I admit to not having much/any experience with this sort of simple search. I was hoping someone here has already trod this trail and can help me out.

Thanks...

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ILLINOIS VEHICLE CODE 625 ILCS 5/

"Every person riding a bicycle upon a highway shall be granted all of the rights and shall be subject to all of the duties applicable to the driver of a vehicle . . ." Section 11-1502

Here.

Thanks. Is there any way to tell from the text or the references when that went onto the books? Also, note at the end of Section 11-1502, this reference: "(Source: P.A. 82-132.)". I assume the "82" means 1982?

The "82" means it originated in the 82nd General Assembly.  We are currently in the 2nd year of the 98th General Assembly.  The 82nd General Assembly would have been 1981-82.

I think that link on the Illinois General Assembly page only gives the actual source of the statute in effect. 

It was passed on May 21, 1981.  Here is a link to the page of the transcript of the final reading a...

If you poke around the web site, eventually you will be able to figure out when it was introduced but the Illinois General Assembly web site is not particularly intuitive for me and I am tired of it already! :-)

Skip Montanaro 12mi said:

Thanks. Is there any way to tell from the text or the references when that went onto the books? Also, note at the end of Section 11-1502, this reference: "(Source: P.A. 82-132.)". I assume the "82" means 1982?

I think the Idaho law makes more sense for cyclists, anyway.

Much more sense! It is a huge step in the right direction, but does not go far enough. If there is no traffic with the right of way at a red light, we should be able to also treat a red light as we treat a yield sign. There is no reason to come to a full stop if carefully going through the light is safe and not impeding anyone's right of way.

The law needs to to everything it can encourage people to ride.

Joe Guzzardo said:

I think the Idaho law makes more sense for cyclists, anyway.

Thanks for the help, folks, especially Lisa's response with the interpretation of "82". I looked through the business about the final reading, but never did find what I was looking for. It is 241 pages long, so I was trying to search for words or fragments of words I thought would have been mentioned.

The ilga.gov webmaster got back to me, saying, "[82-132 is] too far back for us to have online." He gave me the phone number of the IL State Archives. I suppose I could call and have them scan or fax it to me...

http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs3.asp?ActID=1815&Chapt...

Chapter 11, Article XV, second paragraph marked 1502.

Thanks. Yes, I've found this same paragraph multiple times. What I didn't know was how long it's been on the books. Lisa's comment about how to interpret "82-132" was key. This went into effect in 1981.

Other poking around I've done indicates that Idaho implemented the "Idaho Stop" statute in 1982 (treat stop signs as yield signs), and amended it in (I think) 2005 (stop, then go when safe, at lights). Thirty years on, apparently no other state has enacted similar legislation, despite research indicating that it isn't any more dangerous, saves gas, etc.

   (625 ILCS 5/11-1506) (from Ch. 95 1/2, par. 11-1506) 
    Sec. 11-1506. Carrying articles. No person operating a bicycle shall carry any package, bundle or article which prevents the use of both hands in the control and operation of the bicycle. A person operating a bicycle shall keep at least one hand on the handlebars at all times. 
(Source: P.A. 82-132.)             It isn't legal to ride no handed!?!

What about bicycles without handlebars (unicycles)?

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