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Or would the politics, contracts, graft, nepotism and vested interests work to shut it out?

http://pedalpeople.com/index.php

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no it couldnt.
If it could work, I'd apply for a job in a minute.

Being a newbie bike trailer owner, I'm now a big fan of bike trailers and I'm constantly amazed by how much you can haul with them.

Obviously this wouldn't work for hauling heavy machinery, but I don't see why you couldn't efficiently haul other goods this way.
I was thinking the same thing... and came to the conclusion no, I doubt it. But I bet it could work, with enough dedication, in the burbs. I can mostly picture it working in Kenosha WI.

If it wasn't for my moving next year, Id have already tried to get something like this started :-/

If Someone ever decides to try something like that in the Chicago area though, Id be 100% in(while Im here that is).
The replies to this discussion has me wondering what those who have replied know what is going on in Chicago. Half of those who have posted don't seem to reside in Chicago, so how to know what is possible!?!

So no, Chicago does not have a one stop shop for all things bike, but I don't think that there is such a place anywhere. Northhampton does have a cool bike project that is doing a lot of cool things but I'm sure that it could not be compared to the amount of bike activity in Chicago that goes on between several organizations such as Active Trans, Working Bikes, Bike Winter, Cycling Sisters, the Chicago Cycling Club, Loaded Bikes, Critical Mass, the chainlink and others, not to mention West Town Bikes that has events/classes/workshops every day of the week every month of the year.

Also, one of the founders of Pedal People, Ruthie, got her start wrenching at Uptown Bikes (Urban Bikes back then) where she was introduced to bike trailers.

It's great to find out what good stuff is going on all over the world through the internet. That shouldn't be used to dismiss what may be going on outside of the front door because one has yet to simply step out and find what's there.
I have nothing constructive to add here but would like to make note that every time I see the name 'Loaded Bikes' I think it has to do with drunk people riding bikes.
It's a great idea that could work IMO in certain neighborhoods. Downtown? No way. But Ravenswood or a similar area? Sure.
Actually, I think Chicago would be ideal for this kind of business. The grid, the flat grading, a large advocacy community and a reasonably green public that would go in for getting some cars off the road this way are all huge pluses, and the government is theoretically bike-friendly. More than that, it would actually be a pretty useful service. When I lived in Bucktown, for example, it was always a bit of a pain in the ass hauling groceries down North Avenue and I might have paid someone to do it for me.
As for me, I live in more then just one place and while one or more of those places might be outside the city limits, I also live in the city for parts of the year.
Awesome things do exist and could, but I don't picture the Pedal People approach working as successfully.
But then again... no one will know either way unless they try it out

Bikefreeek said:
The replies to this discussion has me wondering what those who have replied know what is going on in Chicago. Half of those who have posted don't seem to reside in Chicago, so how to know what is possible!?!

So no, Chicago does not have a one stop shop for all things bike, but I don't think that there is such a place anywhere. Northhampton does have a cool bike project that is doing a lot of cool things but I'm sure that it could not be compared to the amount of bike activity in Chicago that goes on between several organizations such as Active Trans, Working Bikes, Bike Winter, Cycling Sisters, the Chicago Cycling Club, Loaded Bikes, Critical Mass, the chainlink and others, not to mention West Town Bikes that has events/classes/workshops every day of the week every month of the year.

Also, one of the founders of Pedal People, Ruthie, got her start wrenching at Uptown Bikes (Urban Bikes back then) where she was introduced to bike trailers.

It's great to find out what good stuff is going on all over the world through the internet. That shouldn't be used to dismiss what may be going on outside of the front door because one has yet to simply step out and find what's there.
i was just being a smart ass.
Pedal People are great! They certainly have filled a niche in Northhampton that would be hard to compare to Chicago as far as geography and environment go. However, Chicago is ripe for bike delivery. This can easily be seen by the number of Pot Belly's bike delivery folks out there. There are other good examples such as Time Out Chicago and Momentum magazines being delivered by bike in Chicago (Time Out use to be delivered almost exclusively by bike in the greater Loop area). Design classes at DePaul, Columbia College and UIC are all working on local bicycle business in a wide awray of topics and approach.

The potential for bike delivery in Chicago is awesome and now is the time to get in on it. I'd say if you are a business owner strongly consider doing local business travel and delivery by bike. If this means investing into a company bike and trailer I know it'll pay for itself within less than a year on savings in fuel and maintenance. It can also be a unique way to advertise.

If you have business savy, now is the time to get in on the ground floor of what will become a boom market. Four Star courier is having a custom cargo bike built for them to meet the demand of larger deliveries. A trailer was one of their first company equipment buys. The demand for affordable and accessible delivery will be growing

I suppose a larger point I'm trying to make is how to change ideas of "Could this work in Chicago?" to more of "This is working in Chicago and I'm going to be part of it!".
Good point :-)
maybe I'm a bit far behind, but isn't Tzippy doing this out of the old WTB? Appropriate Technology??

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