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i am going clipless. probably gotta be spd. any suggestions for shoes? pedals?

thanks
a

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Love my Keen's- I have big wide feet so they are pretty comfie
Make sure you get mountain bike style shoes, like these or these. They have a profile that will prevent the cleat from hitting the floor.
For the city, SPD is probably best - unless it's a race machine you're outfitting.

Shoes are a very personal thing, so you're probably best going into a shop and trying on a few different brands (though you can definitely use suggested brands as tryouts).

As far as cleats go, I'd recommend the black Shimano SH-51 SPD cleats. They're single release, so you can only get out if you swing your heel outward. Easy to remember, and your chance of becoming unclipped when riding is minimized.

Also, make sure the mechanic who installs your new pedals sets the tension to the minimum(on both sides if you go with double-sided pedals). This will make it easiest to clip in and out.

I have these on a couple of my bikes. I like them, but they might not be what you're looking for.

Happy hunting!
I like Looks a lot (Keo).

I've tried SPD (too small), Time (heavy) and Keywins (my favorites : but forget about trying to get new cleats).

MTB shoes are best for city/casual riding.
for road and racing - the stiffer the better (I like Specialized Carbons, Time are good also)

this is really a personal preference.

what type of bike and riding are these for btw ?

DB
do-h. shouldda read this first.
great points below.
also - learn how to adjust the float and tension yourself for future tweaking.
It's easy. :-)

Tank-Ridin' Ryan said:
For the city, SPD is probably best - unless it's a race machine you're outfitting.

Shoes are a very personal thing, so you're probably best going into a shop and trying on a few different brands (though you can definitely use suggested brands as tryouts).

As far as cleats go, I'd recommend the black Shimano SH-51 SPD cleats. They're single release, so you can only get out if you swing your heel outward. Easy to remember, and your chance of becoming unclipped when riding is minimized.

Also, make sure the mechanic who installs your new pedals sets the tension to the minimum(on both sides if you go with double-sided pedals). This will make it easiest to clip in and out.

I have these on a couple of my bikes. I like them, but they might not be what you're looking for.

Happy hunting!
i have a redline 925 set up fixed. these will be for riding to and fro about town, with the occasional longer jaunt. also i am looking into to getting a touring bike as i hope to do some long rides next summer.

"float" what is this thing?

also, from what i have looked at all the pedals seem kinda tiny....
float is the amount that a pedal can 'flex' laterally. (i.e. too tight = knee problems).
you can also adjust the tension to clip in and out.
a good compromise for fixed and city riding is the campus pedal (at performance).
SPD cleat on one side; the other side is a standard metal pedal you can choose to add clips and or straps, etc.

go into a good bike shop on a slow day and just pick the brains of the folks in there.
You will learn a lot.

and post here too :-)

DB

AR said:
i have a redline 925 set up fixed. these will be for riding to and fro about town, with the occasional longer jaunt. also i am looking into to getting a touring bike as i hope to do some long rides next summer.

"float" what is this thing?

also, from what i have looked at all the pedals seem kinda tiny....
AR said:
i have a redline 925 set up fixed. these will be for riding to and fro about town, with the occasional longer jaunt. also i am looking into to getting a touring bike as i hope to do some long rides next summer.

Ah, the classic "I want one solution that does it all" question. As usual it is not that simple..
I think that for city riding an SPD based system with mountain bike style shoes would be best (Actually I think regular shoes on an old fashioned platform pedal is best for city riding, but that is a discussion for another thread). Mountain bike style shoes allow you to walk around more comfortable and generally SPD pedals tend to be cheaper. Like DB said, if your focus is performance oriented riding (that is not necessarily the same as longer rides), you might be better off with a Look or Time road pedal, since they are more efficient at transferring power. Downside is that they are harder to walk on, and tend to be more expensive than SPD pedals).

I do longer rides (50-100 miles) including loaded touring, but I am not performance oriented. I do have 2 bikes (a Surly LHT and a Co-Motion road tandem) on which I have Shimano SPD M-520 pedals (<$50 when on sale @ Performance) I have Sidi Bullet shoes for spring and fall riding and Keen Commuter SPD shoes for summer.
BTW, none of my city rides has clipless pedals.
Frank
Hi AR - you may want to check a few existing threads on this topic.

Cleats on cycle shoes - a revised question
Pedals
Bike Shoes


For what it's worth, I use SPDs on my road bike and dual pedals (flat on one side, spds on the other) on my city bike.
thanks, i guess i didn't search properly before posting....

Leah said:
Hi AR - you may want to check a few existing threads on this topic.

Cleats on cycle shoes - a revised question
Pedals
Bike Shoes


For what it's worth, I use SPDs on my road bike and dual pedals (flat on one side, spds on the other) on my city bike.
im tring to get rid of these. there like brand new but they seem a little small for me. they say there an 11.5 but they feel more like a 10.5 or 11. ill let them go for like $70 obo or trade for mountain shoes
Attachments:
Hey Marc,

Leah already pointed out a few existing threads to AR.

Video_Drome said:
how about searching the damn forum for the answer to this fucking question




sorry this is like the bazillionth one of these "i'm finally being a bad ass and going clipless, what kinda shit should i get" threads

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