The Chainlink

Anybody know what that weird green stuff is in the biking lane on Milwaukee Ave?

Since Milwaukee is such a main artery when biking, I was wondering if anyone knew why that one small section of its bike lane is green?  If you're going southeast on Milwaukee (west side of the street), it's between Cortez (I think?) and Augusta. 

It kind of looks like paint, but not sure.  It doesn't seem to serve any purpose I can discern.  I do try to avoid that green part when it's wet out, as it looks kinda slippery.

Just curious.  Anybody know?

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"The green stripe isn’t paint—it’s skid-resistant thermoplastic, a material that sticks to asphalt when it gets hot, making it more durable than paint. Similar treatments are used in Portland, Oregon, and Burlington, Vermont, as well as Europe."

Read more: http://chicago.timeout.com/articles/out-there/21180/color-scheme

I'm sure there are explanations from CDOT or Active Trans but this showed up first in my search.
I wouldn't worry about it, it's less slippery than the white divider line. It's just to alert drivers the bike lane runs straight through to the intersection, because the turn lane is to the right of the bike lane. It's never been clear to me why that particular intersection merits the special treatment, but I don't mind.
There is a patch of it at Lincoln/Sheffield/Wrightwood on Lincoln going Southbound as well. I've been told it's not as slippery as well but it sure looks slick when it rains.
Because the drivers can merge into the right turn lane, the bike lane is colored green to alert them that the lane a) exists and b) goes between the lanes. This is in hopes they will look out for bikes when you go into the turn lane.
I've ridden the patch on Milwaukee near Augusta in the rain and snow. It's not slick. Visually it does seem to assist cyclists and drivers to get in a proper lane at a chaotic intersection.
i think it feels great to ride on!

I agree. I wish we saw more of this.
It is green because that is the part of Milwaukee that is the most environmentally great to bike on.
Brandon Orozco said:
i think it feels great to ride on!

I agree with this, too! I guess as long as I know it's not as slippery as it looks when it's wet, I won't avoid it anymore when it's raining.
soylent green is people!
be careful though when it is wet (and also cold) - this sign really does apply :

"Slippery When Wet".

in those cases I ride about 6" to one side of it. but that's just me.

DB

Aaron Bussey said:
soylent green is people!
With one caveat. It will get slippery over time. These thermoplastic transfers are manufactured with grit in them (I think it's silicate). As the transfers wear, the grit will disappear before the plastic leaving a non-porous surface behind. Think Slip-n-Slide.

Shay said:
Brandon Orozco said:
i think it feels great to ride on!

I agree with this, too! I guess as long as I know it's not as slippery as it looks when it's wet, I won't avoid it anymore when it's raining.
I was talking to somebody about it last night and the areas where it's applied are test areas as a better surface to bike on but was abandoned when a member of Active Trans ate it in the winter on it.

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