The Chainlink

Share your pics, videos, streets, stories of what you find in the bike lane of the non-bike variety that has an impact on your ride and/or your safety. I've decided to keep it a little more open ended - cars, snow, buses, garbage, cabs, etc. If they shouldn't be in the bike lane, go ahead and add it to this thread. Please be safe if you are taking pics or video! :-) 

My hope is that we can collectively build some evidence of what we see when riding in the city with the overall hope of better enforcement of "bikes only" and improving maintenance. 

Update: More Hashtags to Capture Vehicles in the Bike Lane

With popular hashtags:
#BikeLaneShaming

#LaneSpreading (Chicago Bike Selling)

#ClearTheWay (ActiveTrans), there are many options to capture violations.

We think you should use ALL of them AND post your photos on The Chainlink. ;-)

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301 N Orleans St. 311 report submitted.

375 N Orleans St. 311 report submitted.

275 S Franklin St. 311 report submitted.

225 N Franklin St. 311 report submitted.

9-40-060 Driving, standing or parking on bicycle paths or lanes prohibited. (a) The driver of a vehicle shall not drive, unless entering or exiting a legal parking space, or stand, or park the vehicle upon any on-street path or lane designated by official signs or markings for the use of bicycles, or otherwise drive or place the vehicle in such a manner as to impede bicycle traffic on such path or lane. The driver of a vehicle shall not stand or park the vehicle upon any lane designated by pavement markings for the shared use of motor vehicles and bicycles, or place the vehicle in such a manner as to impede bicycle traffic on such lane; provided, however, the driver of a bus may stop the bus in any such lane (i) at a designated bus stop for the purpose of loading or unloading of passengers, (ii) in case of an emergency; or (iii) as permitted in Section 9-48-050(d) of this Code. In addition to the fine provided in Section 9-4-025 of this Code, any vehicle parked in violation of this section shall be subject to an immediate tow and removal to a city vehicle pound or authorized garage.

327 and 353 N Desplaines St. 311 reports submitted.

353 N Desplaines St. 311 report submitted.

9-40-060 Driving, standing or parking on bicycle paths or lanes prohibited. (a) The driver of a vehicle shall not drive, unless entering or exiting a legal parking space, or stand, or park the vehicle upon any on-street path or lane designated by official signs or markings for the use of bicycles, or otherwise drive or place the vehicle in such a manner as to impede bicycle traffic on such path or lane. The driver of a vehicle shall not stand or park the vehicle upon any lane designated by pavement markings for the shared use of motor vehicles and bicycles, or place the vehicle in such a manner as to impede bicycle traffic on such lane; provided, however, the driver of a bus may stop the bus in any such lane (i) at a designated bus stop for the purpose of loading or unloading of passengers, (ii) in case of an emergency; or (iii) as permitted in Section 9-48-050(d) of this Code. In addition to the fine provided in Section 9-4-025 of this Code, any vehicle parked in violation of this section shall be subject to an immediate tow and removal to a city vehicle pound or authorized garage.

"Bike Lanes Do Help Keep Cyclists Safe."  5-31-19

Not necessarily from the "safety in numbers" effect.

https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2019-05-31/bike-la...

Sigh. One can't look at total fatalities. One must use fatalities per mile. Did the number of miles traveled by bike go up because more bike lanes were available? Are more people cycling? Did the fatalities happen in the bike lanes, or elsewhere?

Things get complicated.  From the article: "For example, Portland saw the biggest increase in bike lanes. Between 1990 and 2010, city's bike lanes increased from 1% to 6%, while the road fatality rate dropped by 75%."   So far, so good.  But now look what happens after 2010 in different study:

Portland fares worse indexed against a national average, all while the national trend is itself getting worse, not better.   See brown line for Portland and the black line for the National Trend in the attached graph with this article, especially in 2016-18.  https://usa.streetsblog.org/2019/05/22/are-we-starting-to-see-progr...

I'm not suggesting that it is the proliferation of bike lanes since 2010 that is making both Portland and the nation more dangerous, even while bike lane prevalence is up, and fatalities are on an overall uptick since 2010 in this graph, merely noting that things may be a little more complicated with so many variables in play. 

Agreed Argonne, a denominator would add a lot.  More people, more distance, someone could even offer that there was lower congestion and thus higher speeds thus injury incidents became fatal accidents, which reminds us injuries are important too.  Some also suggest that utility about travel times per mile, i.e. faster per mile is more favorable, could be included.  That's controversial, but if it wasn't favorable on one axis, people wouldn't run stop signs or speed, or ride a bike instead of walk. 

This was doing on the new Polk protected bike lane on Friday

https://twitter.com/84EWashington/status/1134623200338489345

"Wow... what a nice, convenient place to park my Bimmer!" :-/

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