The Chainlink

To the "cyclist" who knocked my friend off her Divvy bike on the lakefront path.

She has a very large cuts on her face, her legs, she might have a concussion. Her nice dress and boots are ruined. She was shaken up pretty bad but she's determined to keep riding her bike dispite how nasty you were and blamed her.

And the first thing she said to you was "Are you okay?"

 

You make me embarrased to be a cyclist.

 

I know exactly who you are, burning ass down the trail like you own it. Agressively passing with a sense of entitlement. Too smug to bother to call out "on your left." I used to be just like you until I realized that the lake front path is not the place to train for a triathalon.

 

Slow the hell down and be nice to people!

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I have a feeling this will be a topic that will be on the front page for years. 


Say what now?


Tom Dworzanski said:

Sorry this happened to your friend. Hindsight is 20/20 and it's not always easy to know how to react. It seems to me the most appropriate way to act in the situation is to make sure she is okay, then to arrest his bicycle so he can't leave, and finally to call the police. Doing that would allow for the wrongful party to be cited appropriately. It may also help with making sure all the liability issues can be settled.

As you like to say h', "maybe your Google isn't working?" No problem, I'll help you out.

ah-rest
verb (used with object)
1. to seize (a person) by legal authority or warrant; take into custody: The police arrested the burglar.
2. to catch and hold; attract and fix; engage: The loud noise arrested our attention.
3. to check the course of; stop; slow down: to arrest progress.
4. Medicine/Medical . to control or stop the active progress of (a disease): The new drug did not arrest the cancer.
noun
5. the taking of a person into legal custody, as by officers of the law.
6. any seizure or taking by force.
7. an act of stopping or the state of being stopped: the arrest of tooth decay.
8. Machinery . any device for stopping machinery; stop.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/arrest


h' 1.0 said:


Say what now?
Tom Dworzanski said:

Sorry this happened to your friend. Hindsight is 20/20 and it's not always easy to know how to react. It seems to me the most appropriate way to act in the situation is to make sure she is okay, then to arrest his bicycle so he can't leave, and finally to call the police. Doing that would allow for the wrongful party to be cited appropriately. It may also help with making sure all the liability issues can be settled.

Lol like this:



peter moormann said:

Slap some coffs on that bike!

Yeah, got that part, thanks.  Just wondering if you're seriously suggesting that the OP's friend should have got up off the ground and somehow taken this other person's bike into custody.

I have never, ever posted "maybe your Google isn't working."  You're a real piece of work.



Tom Dworzanski said:

As you like to say h', "maybe your Google isn't working?" No problem, I'll help you out.

ah-rest
verb (used with object)
1. to seize (a person) by legal authority or warrant; take into custody: The police arrested the burglar.
2. to catch and hold; attract and fix; engage: The loud noise arrested our attention.
3. to check the course of; stop; slow down: to arrest progress.
4. Medicine/Medical . to control or stop the active progress of (a disease): The new drug did not arrest the cancer.
noun
5. the taking of a person into legal custody, as by officers of the law.
6. any seizure or taking by force.
7. an act of stopping or the state of being stopped: the arrest of tooth decay.
8. Machinery . any device for stopping machinery; stop.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/arrest


h' 1.0 said:


Say what now?
Tom Dworzanski said:

Sorry this happened to your friend. Hindsight is 20/20 and it's not always easy to know how to react. It seems to me the most appropriate way to act in the situation is to make sure she is okay, then to arrest his bicycle so he can't leave, and finally to call the police. Doing that would allow for the wrongful party to be cited appropriately. It may also help with making sure all the liability issues can be settled.

The board LOVES to defend people going too fast (read that as faster than safety allows), especially on the LFT. Too fast for conditions DOES equal dangerous, necessarily, and it DOES equal asshole behavior. Even if the person that gets run down is an idiot.

There's a reason there are speed limits for cars on the streets: 50 mph is too fast for all but a few throughfares. My car will easily drive faster than the conditions allow. Likewise speeding on the trails: just because you can doesn't mean it's safe, smart or civilized.

We don't know what happened but there is no doubt that speed is part of the equation and that slower speeds would have prevented or reduced the impact. If you're going too fast to avoid an accident, you're going too fast.

Will G - 10mi said:


The board LOVES to complain about people going too fast (read that as faster than them), especially on the LFT. Fast does not equal dangerous, necessarily, nor does is equal asshole behavior.

Arresting bikes is all well and good, but what about that pizza and beer idea?

Well, we better just crawl everywhere then, right?

Look I get what you are saying, Dug and I were just trying to get the full story. It is possible, whether you'll acknowledge it or not, that "fast" in this context may not have been "too fast" and this unknown riders speed might not have really been the reason for the accident.

The point is that WE DON'T KNOW WHAT HAPPENED and OP won't elaborate. 

Reboot Oxnard said:

The board LOVES to defend people going too fast (read that as faster than safety allows), especially on the LFT. Too fast for conditions DOES equal dangerous, necessarily, and it DOES equal asshole behavior. Even if the person that gets run down is an idiot.

There's a reason there are speed limits for cars on the streets: 50 mph is too fast for all but a few throughfares. My car will easily drive faster than the conditions allow. Likewise speeding on the trails: just because you can doesn't mean it's safe, smart or civilized.

We don't know what happened but there is no doubt that speed is part of the equation and that slower speeds would have prevented or reduced the impact. If you're going too fast to avoid an accident, you're going too fast.

Will G - 10mi said:


The board LOVES to complain about people going too fast (read that as faster than them), especially on the LFT. Fast does not equal dangerous, necessarily, nor does is equal asshole behavior.

Who is "the board" and dare I ask how he got that nickname?

Reboot Oxnard said:

The board LOVES to defend people going too fast

Clearly the person who fled should stop and not ride off. She could have been seriously hurt. Fleeing the scene makes me think there may be some guilt with the person going faster than the Divvy. I don't know how the (Divvy) was riding her bike but if a collision occurred, they both should have stopped. No excuse. 

That said, there seems to be a spandex/road bike stereotype I find puzzling. Yes, there are some roadies that go faster in high traffic spots and that is a dangerous choice - pedestrians and small children don't tend to pay attention by the beach. Having passed a lot of Divvy riders on LFP, I am very cautious of them because a high percentage weave, don't look to the left before moving left, or generally are not paying as much attention. Those bikes are a lot heavier than my road bike. I don't want to find out what will happen if they hit me. Do I call "on your left" to everyone I pass? Nearly but not 100%. But when I do say "on your left" I've noticed sometimes I have to say it 3 times and even then there's no guarantee.

All I know is anyone who rides slower than me is an idiot, and anyone who rides faster than me is a maniac!

+1.

The problem is we all think this way.


Jason W said:

All I know is anyone who rides slower than me is an idiot, and anyone who rides faster than me is a maniac!

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