The Chainlink

I was wondering what the etiquette is on this. From what I've read, they don't make a lot and online searches don't give any consensus.  What's the standard in Chicago and if it's expected, how much?  What about tipping on work that is done under warranty?

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To address the original question, (1) Chicagoland shops do generally tend to pay less than other big bike markets (2) There isn't the tipping culture here that you find elsewhere.

 

The exception to (2) may be at the pro shops, where it's certainly more common. But still quite different than other cities... more like "here are a few extra bucks for doing a good job" as opposed to "here's an extra $100 for rushing this wheelbuild".

(Not that I subscribe, but) here's what Bicycling magazine has to say about Bike Shop Etiquette.

 

I'd also like to add to the discussion that bike shops make very little money. When average markup on new bikes is only 40% you may come to appreciate that the folks who are working in the industry are doing it because they love bicycling and want to put more people on bikes. If you consider yourself a bike advocate or activist I would encourage you to help support those who actually keep people rolling on their bikes. They're working hard for little and love when people acknowledge it.

The Bicycling article hits on an important point, one that is far more important to the mechanic at your LBS than tipping.

 

Buy your parts at a LBS, The internet and great deals are a wonderful thing but they are not going to keep the doors of the bike shop that takes care of you when you have a problem open.

 

Bikefreeek said:

(Not that I subscribe, but) here's what Bicycling magazine has to say about Bike Shop Etiquette.

 

I'd also like to add to the discussion that bike shops make very little money. When average markup on new bikes is only 40% you may come to appreciate that the folks who are working in the industry are doing it because they love bicycling and want to put more people on bikes. If you consider yourself a bike advocate or activist I would encourage you to help support those who actually keep people rolling on their bikes. They're working hard for little and love when people acknowledge it.

If you don't support your internet parts supplier they are going to go out of business and put good people out of work...
I prefer to support the employees that work for places I can walk into and hold someone accountable.

James Baum said:
If you don't support your internet parts supplier they are going to go out of business and put good people out of work...

I like that this became a debate of austrian economics and whether or not people have free will in the workforce.   I'm a bike mechanic and I enjoy when people tip me.  I also love what I do and am more dependent on steady business to make an hourly wage. 

 

If you can't tip or do not feel like it, that's fine.  It isn't expected.  As for standards, I'd say 80-90% of folks do not tip and those that do generally give in the $2-10 range although beer and food do seem to be acceptable to many mechanics. 

 

James, while you're welcome at any bike shop, I hope that your opposition to tipping keeps you out of restaurants.

Paul, I hope you didn't read that I am in opposition to tipping -I'm not.  I was in opposition to anyone who said I could NOT tip.  I'll tip or not tip as I feel fit (even over-tip sometimes because that's my choice.) And I'll fight for anyone else's right to do the same and to enter into mutualy-agreed-upon  contracts in exchange for labor and or other value at what ever rates they wish without outside interference from governmental, pseudo-governmental, or guild bosses telling them it is for too little or too much.  

 

As an espouser of the true Free Market how could I expect any less?

Paul Fitz, Scrabblor said:

I like that this became a debate of austrian economics and whether or not people have free will in the workforce.   I'm a bike mechanic and I enjoy when people tip me.  I also love what I do and am more dependent on steady business to make an hourly wage. 

 

If you can't tip or do not feel like it, that's fine.  It isn't expected.  As for standards, I'd say 80-90% of folks do not tip and those that do generally give in the $2-10 range although beer and food do seem to be acceptable to many mechanics. 

 

James, while you're welcome at any bike shop, I hope that your opposition to tipping keeps you out of restaurants.

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