The Chainlink

I'd love to see the steeds that you are all riding.  I see a mixture of different bikes on my way to work, from the carbon roadie, to the purpose driven MTB, and the old steel classics.  What are you riding?  What's your favorite feature about it?

I'll start:

My normal ride is my Trek 3500, I wanted an entry level disc brake bike for just commuting purposes.  I installed the Planet Bike Cascadia fenders and roll with a PDW Radbot 1000 taillight and MagicShine 808E.  So far it has been a blast, the big tires soak up the bumps and jumps on the road and the suspension fork (although REALLY basic works well).  Aptly named Ronto.

The other ride is my fun ride and nice day commuter.  For a while it was my only bike until I realized that the winter would suck on a skinny tired road bike.  I don't have a picture but it is a Trek 1.5.  Both bought from VCC.

Lets see your ride and your ride's name!

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This is my 2010 WorkCycles Omafiets. 

  • lugged steel frame
  • Shimano 8-speed internal hub
  • roller brakes front and back
  • dynamo hub/lights front and back
  • 28-inch wheels, Schwalbe marathon tires
  • front and rear racks
  • rear wheel lock

I ride this every day, year-round.  I love this heavy bike like you would not believe. The ABUS lock adds another 5lbs. 

We're batting 100 here, all of these bikes so far are amazing in their own way. 

Yeah I love the vast differences on what people commute on.  Really cool to see what people use and what best suits each individual's purpose.  

I liked the LOTR reference on the one bike to rule them all...haha!

Here's my Jamis Nova, a 2001 model I think.  I got the frame/fork for free and pulled a bunch of parts over from my old Schwinn commuter.  It's a Reynolds 631 cyclocross frame with a super short wheelbase, so there's a lot of toe overlap, but it's fairly light and snappy, and fast enough for commuting.  It has different bars/stem and a different rear wheel since I took this pic.  I could probably shave some weight by replacing the steel fenders with aluminum or plastic, but I really like how they look, and the full coverage is nice.

some quick specs:

1" threadless Aheadset with 1-1/8" shim

Bontrager stem/Trek aluminum flat bars

105 square taper 175mm cranks, 42T ring, Shimano 16T freewheel, Surly Singleator

105 front hub, Wolber Alpine 32h rim

Surly flip/flop rear hub, Alex R390 32h rim

Deore V-brakes with BMX levers

Bontrager seatpost with Specialized MTB saddle

Topeak MTB rack and steel 3spd cruiser fenders

In 2012 I sold my beloved Nishiki Olympic to get another person on the road and bought myself a commuter. I had the idea of getting a dutch style bike with an internal hub and dynamo but my commute is 13-16 miles depending on the route. On The Route talked me out of the commuter. For a minute I thought it was bait and switch until I realized it was a much better idea. I went back the next day and bought a Trek 7.5fx and added fenders and a rack. Otherwise, its all stock.  I use Ortlieb back roller panniers and a Nightrider Lumina 350 light. There are rear blinkers on a pannier, the seat and  duck taped to my helmet. I am happy with whatever the city has to offer and can ride 50+ heading away from the urban veloland without feeling like I am working too hard. 

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Back in 2008 I went looking for a Trek 7.something after riding a friend's and ended up with a base LeMond for about the same price.  Got me hooked on drop bars, but it wasn't made for fenders and racks, which is how I ended up with a touring bike.  A Dutch bike would be a real drag on that long a commute.

That makes sense. I would have considered a touring bike like a Surly but the Trek, although not cheap, was less than the Surly. I already have a road bike that I like. Still, I regret not buying my cousin's Lemond when he decided to get something newer and shinier. I have heard nothing bad about the brand and the geometry is good for my short legs and arms.

Tricolor said:

Back in 2008 I went looking for a Trek 7.something after riding a friend's and ended up with a base LeMond for about the same price.  Got me hooked on drop bars, but it wasn't made for fenders and racks, which is how I ended up with a touring bike.  A Dutch bike would be a real drag on that long a commute.

My commuter/trainer/tri bike is a 2001 LeMond Buenos Aires. After my Xtracycle was stolen (incidentally, built off of a Trek 7.2FX), I converted it into my do-everything bike. Here's an old thread detailing how I made it commuter-ready (e.g., fenders, panniers, platform pedals over the Speedplay pedals) but still allow for aquick strip down for long training rides or triathlons. I've owned this bike since new, and dearly love everything about it.

Here's a pic from this spring, mixing some mid-distance tri training with commuting.

My Raleigh Grand Prix, 3-Speed Conversion with a Tartis-like (think about it) Frost River Saddle Bag. It simply gets me where I want to go, comfortably, and without any mechanical drama. New wheel set courtesy West Town Bikes. Hub Polishers and shellacked handlebar tape courtesy Blue City Cycles. Sunbeam cottered, pedal crank courtesy Working Bikes.

That is just so nice. 

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