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I'm looking for some new pedals for my road/commuter bike.  Does anyone have any suggestions?  I'm looking for some half clipless/half platform, or some nice platform pedals with cages.  Thoughts/Ideas/Suggestions?

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I agree with Heather, The only time I wish I had the option of just a platform is when it is below 16 degrees.
Then it would be nice to have a warmer pair of boots on...curt

heather stratton said:
I am also surprised by the comments against clipless pedals. I have spds on two bikes and toe clips on the other, and I find the toe clips to be more trouble than clipping in, which as craig s said is basically the same as setting your foot down on a platform. As for the OP question, I used the double-sided clipless/ platform for about 2 months, and I did not like it. The spd aide was heavier, I think, so when I wanted to ride on that side I was always having to flip the pedal over. I realize that doesn't sound that bad, but I found it annoying.
Hi, I have the EZY version of the MKS Lambdas on my folder (Bike Friday Tikit Express) and really love them. They come on and off in seconds, have a nice large platform that is comfortable to ride on with no "hot spots" over long distance, and grip pretty well with most everyday shoes. They are really nice for commuting or in traffic, as clipping out is not an issue. They are kind of expensive, but worth it in my opinion. My other pedals are SPD on one side, and flat on the other, giving me a choice of what to wear on any given ride. They are Shimano, but are sometimes a pain to keep on the needed side while riding with many stops and starts. I have been generally happy with them though due to their versitalily. Hope this helps. I don't like cages at all, tried them for a while, and clipping in and out is easier for me. Again, the Lambdas are really nice for daily use. They also have reflectors for visability at night.

Kevin Conway said:
For my city/commuter I have the MKS lambdas:


I like the freedom of using whatever shoes I have on.

For my touring bike, I have the Shimano PD-M324s:


Both work well for their respective purposes.
with
I have had these (Shimano MT21) since august and am still on the original cleats:


They clip into these: *Crank Brothers Mallet)

(In blue). In extreme snow I'll raise the set screws and wear winter boots. At the same time I can use any pair of street shoes, no need for flipping the pedal for the sweet spot.

I ride fixed and unclip 1-3 times total on a 12 mile daily commute.
Someone said there is an adaptor that clips onto Egg Beaters to be able to ride with any type of shoe. Is this true? If so, what is the name and where can these adaptors be purchased?

ERCHLVRSN said:
Egg Beater...4 sided pedals are much better than a 2 sided or 1 sided road pedals.
Seri97 said:
Someone said there is an adaptor that clips onto Egg Beaters to be able to ride with any type of shoe. Is this true? If so, what is the name and where can these adaptors be purchased?

ERCHLVRSN said:
Egg Beater...4 sided pedals are much better than a 2 sided or 1 sided road pedals.

It looks like there is, however it's a plastic thing designed for test rides and not intended for actual real life usage. However, it looks like getting a pair machined wouldn't be too difficult.

Kevin, Are you still riding these? Two years later, would you recommend them?

I need new pedals, and they look very nice, but aren't exactly cheap.



Kevin C said:

For my city/commuter I have the MKS lambdas:


I like the freedom of using whatever shoes I have on.

For my touring bike, I have the Shimano PD-M324s:


Both work well for their respective purposes.

I do. My only complaint is that in rainy and wet, snowy (remember "snowy?") conditions, depending on my shoes, they can be a bit slippery. Rivendell even has a video out there somewhere about drilling a couple of holes in the fronts of the pedal and screwing some threaded studs in there for added traction in wet conditions. I have never performed that modification, but I am more conscious of fully weighting the pedals in wet weather. But overall, I like them very much and have ridden them with everything from sandals and bare feet to snow boots. I bought them from Niagara, who still carry them at 40 bucks or so.

Duppie said:

Kevin, Are you still riding these? Two years later, would you recommend them?

I need new pedals, and they look very nice, but aren't exactly cheap.



Kevin C said:

For my city/commuter I have the MKS lambdas:


I like the freedom of using whatever shoes I have on.

For my touring bike, I have the Shimano PD-M324s:


Both work well for their respective purposes.

Thanks Kevin. I just ordered a pair.

Kevin C said:

I do. My only complaint is that in rainy and wet, snowy (remember "snowy?") conditions, depending on my shoes, they can be a bit slippery. Rivendell even has a video out there somewhere about drilling a couple of holes in the fronts of the pedal and screwing some threaded studs in there for added traction in wet conditions. I have never performed that modification, but I am more conscious of fully weighting the pedals in wet weather. But overall, I like them very much and have ridden them with everything from sandals and bare feet to snow boots. I bought them from Niagara, who still carry them at 40 bucks or so.

Duppie said:

Kevin, Are you still riding these? Two years later, would you recommend them?

I need new pedals, and they look very nice, but aren't exactly cheap.



Kevin C said:

For my city/commuter I have the MKS lambdas:


I like the freedom of using whatever shoes I have on.

For my touring bike, I have the Shimano PD-M324s:


Both work well for their respective purposes.

If you're going to ride clipless, mountain bike shoes are much more practical because you can actually walk in them, due to the recessed cleat position.  Whether or not you ride with cleats, bike sandals are a nice way to go for warmer weather.  Here's a women's version and a men's version.  

If any of you have plantar fasciitis or other foot problems that can cause foot pain from riding in non-bike-specific shoes, switching to the rigid sole of a bike shoe can make a HUGE difference in reducing pain and making bike riding more enjoyable again.

If they're compatible with your pedals, strapless toe clips are a nice in-between option.

Tony Adams said:

Clipless also requires special expensive and generally stupid looking shoes. Why force yourself to carry around an extra pair of shoes just so you can ride your bike to work? Biking is fun and it does not have to require a ton of rigmarole, expense or clown suits.

Once off the bike, hobbling around like a wounded puppet in tap shoes conveys an image to non-riders that biking is troublesome.

+1 for clipless and SPD MTB pedals -notably Eggbeaters with MTB shoes, my personal favorite.

Clipless pedals may be a bit of a PITA because of the special shoes -but they are like cheating when the rides get longer.  Riding clicked-in is like a free 25%-30% free extra power/endurance if not even more.    Going back to platforms for anything but short <15 mile rides seems like wasted energy.  They are well worth putting on the "special shoes" IMHO.  Riding in platform pedals sucks.  It is like a car you have to get out and go to the front and crank every time you need to start it.  

Anne Alt said:

If you're going to ride clipless, mountain bike shoes are much more practical because you can actually walk in them, due to the recessed cleat position.  Whether or not you ride with cleats, bike sandals are a nice way to go for warmer weather.  Here's a women's version and a men's version.  

If any of you have plantar fasciitis or other foot problems that can cause foot pain from riding in non-bike-specific shoes, switching to the rigid sole of a bike shoe can make a HUGE difference in reducing pain and making bike riding more enjoyable again.

If they're compatible with your pedals, strapless toe clips are a nice in-between option.


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