The Chainlink

Friend's Seat Keeps Getting Stolen - What should I buy her?

So obviously my friend has really bad seat karma... or something. This is the third time her seat has gotten stolen. I'm not sure on her setup prior to this third seat, but this past time she was using a cable lock... Are there any other options (short of taking her seat with her) to deter this? I only searched for about a minute, and I found this product and one other like it:
http://www.saveyourseatlock.com/index.html

What can I get for her so her saddle doesn't get stolen again?
Forgot to mention that she was swearing she was going to have a friend solder her seat on for her... HAHA

Jason

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Take a section of old chain in an old tube or heat shrink tube and use it to secure the seat to the stays.
When you say 'cable lock'.. do you mean the seat itself was locked with a cable through the rails? If so, I'm not sure there is anything that will deter THAT level of seat thievery without taking it with you (get a quick release seat collar and pull it off when parked). Otherwise, I like a small wire cable that goes over the seat rails and through the seatstays. Locked with a mini padlock. Unless she has a relatively "desirable" seat (Brooks, nice Fizik), which it sounds like not, that should give zero problems from now on.
Otherwise, if you want to be a sneak...
Depending on your seatpost collar lock and seatpost's rail locking mechanism, you can replace those two (or three) screws with these:

http://www.mcmaster.com/#=457mz5

Otherwise, for the $$, you can invest in something like Pitlock:
http://www.urbanbiketech.com/
Sorry, bad link before for the McMaster screws. Try this:
http://tinyurl.com/yzx4vek

They have various styles of very unusual head designs that are listed as "security" style. Just search under socket head screws.
Does it have a quick release? If so, replace it with a non-quick release binder (not sure of the exact term)
should be like $7 at a bike shop. Quick release seat posts are unnecessary on a bike that one uses for commuting/errand running, since you rarely change your seatpost once it is dialed-in.
Frank
OnGuard makes a locking skewer set for a bike's wheels and seat. This has (knock on wood) worked real well for me. Of course, you must have the special key with you if you ever need to remove the wheel. Getting a flat and not having the key is a real pain.

Here's a link to a site that sells the set, but many bike shops also carry this.
http://www.universalcycles.com/shopping/product_details.php?id=27027
If the bike doesn't have a quick release and the height is adjusted right where she needs it, she can just dip a BB pellet in superglue and stick it into the bolt. Easy enough to get the pellet out with some acetone if necessary but there's zero chance a seat thief is going to bother.
Another option which is super cheap and easy and works with any of the other suggestions given is to carry a plastic bag under the seat and cover the seat and tie it down to the seat post. More of a 'out of sight out of mind' deterrant, but effective in that it takes effort to discover what kind of seat is on the bike. Liquid vinyl on a section of bike chain is good too.
Everyone - Thank you so much! I'll have to take a look at her setup and see what I can do to fix it for her.

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