The Chainlink

I just won a Sugino 75 crankset on eBay. I am buying only the arms and spider. So now I need a 144 bcd chainring. (I'm looking for 46 T). How do I determine the quality of a chainring? I mean, a Sugino or Campy or Dura Ace chaingring for this crankset would be pretty expensive. How much might I appreciate a high end chainring? This is for a fixed gear street bike. I'm no track star. Any thoughts appreciated.

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Why not get a NJS certified Sugino track chain ring to go with your crank?
Pricey. They're around $100 new. I might do it, but I am trying to assess whether it's worth it.
Of course you are right. I was just suggesting a dream. Pricey they are indeed!
I have heard people say that some of the more economical chainrings are not always exactly round, and that this might throw your chain off. The better built ones are rounder and will preform better on a fixed setup. I don't know how big of an issue this might be in practice though, just throwing in my $0.02
http://chicago.craigslist.org/chc/bik/1447080238.html


should solve your chainring problem.
Almost. I'm looking for a 46T ring. Thanks, though.

Francis Buxton said:
http://chicago.craigslist.org/chc/bik/1447080238.html


should solve your chainring problem.
I've heard that too. In fact, the chainring on the cranks I'm replacing doesn't seem as round as it could be.

Vando said:
I have heard people say that some of the more economical chainrings are not always exactly round, and that this might throw your chain off. The better built ones are rounder and will preform better on a fixed setup. I don't know how big of an issue this might be in practice though, just throwing in my $0.02
seriously, just put a larger rear cog in and you wont ever notice the difference. I know a lot of people who run the FSA chain ring with their 75's and havnt heard a single complaint. I think theyre 50 each.

Chicago Bicycle Advocate said:
Almost. I'm looking for a 46T ring. Thanks, though.

Francis Buxton said:
http://chicago.craigslist.org/chc/bik/1447080238.html


should solve your chainring problem.
Straight from wikipedia...

A common misconception regarding NJS certification is that it is a mark of quality, when in fact it is simply a mark of standardization; NJS-stamped parts have become fashionable in recent years with some Western cyclists.

Higher quality parts especially on Track stuff will be lighter not necesarilly better...A chainring is a chainring after all. I highly doubt you will be able to notice any difference if any at all between a $30 dollar chainring and a $100 one...

-Ali
Actually, even top-line rings aren't perfectly round. You need to check chain tension by actually spinning the wheel and testing the chain as it goes 'round. Even my Campag and Suntour NJS rings are just slightly eliptical. You need to find that sweet spot between where the chain tightens and goes slack.

Too tight and you get excessive wear and risk a chain ( or even chainring) break.

Too loose and you may throw the chain on a bump (which is a big drag for all concerned...)

If tensioning is properly done and your rings are anywhere near round the chain shouldn't come off.
True that...

Ali said:
Straight from wikipedia...

A common misconception regarding NJS certification is that it is a mark of quality, when in fact it is simply a mark of standardization; NJS-stamped parts have become fashionable in recent years with some Western cyclists.

Higher quality parts especially on Track stuff will be lighter not necesarilly better...A chainring is a chainring after all. I highly doubt you will be able to notice any difference if any at all between a $30 dollar chainring and a $100 one...

-Ali
Thanks folks. I found a 144 bcd, 46 tooth chainring for $50 by a french company called TA. Sheldon Brown recommended this as about as good as campy chainrings for less than half the cost. I'm sure it'll do the job.

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