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Not sure about 2010, but you can find per-county totals for the last few years at

http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/departments/nrd-30/ncsa/STSI/USA%20WEB%20REPORT.HTM.

In a nutshell, Cook County has ranged from 7 to 14 fatalities a year, or .13 to .27 per 100K. Hillsborough, FL has similar raw numbers, ranging from 4 to 11 fatalities a year, but that's a stunning .50 to .97 per 100K population. My sense is that even with the weather difference Chicago has many more cyclist-hours per year, but I don't know that for sure.


mike w. said:
Six in Tampa area? For a smaller metro area, seems like a high number per capita- looks like a good place not to ride... Any stats on how many bike vs car related fatalities in Chicago and Chicago-area available for 2010?

Man, I lived in Tampa and frequently drove this guy's commute since he lives near where my dad does. I know every place mentioned in the article. I didn't get into cycling until after I moved from Tampa, but even so its obvious the Tampa Bay area is terrible for cycling (except for some areas in central St. Pete). There aren't many cyclists in the Bay area and they are mostly cyclist by circumstance not choice. Gandy and 4th Ave are some of the worst streets to ride on. He could have avoided those entirely by taking backroads. Who knows.
What exactly makes them bad? Narrow, fast, lots of craters to avoid?
Was just wondering whether the stats were reflecting deadly infrastructure, or if maybe running cyclists off the road is a local sport.



envane x said:
Man, I lived in Tampa and frequently drove this guy's commute since he lives near where my dad does. I know every place mentioned in the article. I didn't get into cycling until after I moved from Tampa, but even so its obvious the Tampa Bay area is terrible for cycling (except for some areas in central St. Pete). There aren't many cyclists in the Bay area and they are mostly cyclist by circumstance not choice. Gandy and 4th Ave are some of the worst streets to ride on. He could have avoided those entirely by taking backroads. Who knows.
Gandy is a divided highway, 50 mph+, lots of traffic pulling in/out of driveways. 4th Ave is a 6 lane arterial, narrow lanes, heavy traffic during the day. Probably not as bad during the night when he's riding, but with less traffic the cars go faster. Alternate route would be to take San Martin to 1st Avenue (which I've biked myself, but only in the daytime). San Martin is low-traffic but windy and narrow in places, maybe he didn't like it? Who knows, hard to tell unless you've tried it yourself.

St Pete is ridable because its got the old grid in place and you can take lesser roads to almost anywhere. I like taking my dad's Walmart MTB and tooling around when I'm there. Elsewhere the infrastructure is horrible, no way to get anywhere easily except by major roads. And people don't like bikes either, but the behaviour of most bikers doesn't help (i.e. teenagers in all black--no lights crossing Gandy at night nowhere near a crosswalk). Sucks the guy who gets hit is the responsible one.
I ran into a car the other day riding north on Ashland just south of Division. There was abreak in traffic and as I passed the truck on my left a car pulled right in front of me turning left onto a side street. I ran straight into him going at least 20 mph. The amazing thing was I was ok. My bike slid right out from under me and I landed on my feet. The guy stopped and checked to see if I was ok. He didnt even care that I scratch up his passenger side door. I was a little shaken up but managed to ride away on my bike which was totally fine as well. I was so thankful. It's sad to hear about Mr. Smith and soo many others who don't make it.

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