The Chainlink

Anyone else having more flats than usual this year?  Seems like I so much as think about a flat and I'll get one.  Maybe it's simply a matter of it being my turn.

Views: 1191

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

The only time in the last 3 years of riding I've gotten a flat was on Green.  It's pretty nasty in places.  No goatheads, but plenty of broken glass, screws, nails, and other "sharps" if you know what I mean. 

I check my tires by feel every few days and fill them every week or so by feel as well and I have almost no tire problems.

Cameron is right in my opinion; a daily commuter should be a bike that you can just unlock, get on and ride without having to think about it.  I build all of my bikes to require as little work to upkeep as possible.



James BlackHeron said:

Sucks to get a mile into a ride and have a tire explode...

Perhaps it isn't me who needs to re-think his maintenance routine.



Cameron Puetz said:

A commuter bike should be a bike that you can just hop on and go, otherwise it's not really meeting your transportation needs. If you can't just hop on and ride then you need to rethink your build or your preventive maintenance routine.



I agree with you Dug. A skilled rider/mechanic can tell if pressure is correct just by feel -especially when riding the bike.   When a skilled mechanic is told that he perhaps should "rethink your build or your preventive maintenance routine" by someone who's tire blew up not five miles into a ride within the last 48 hours due to extreme neglect and/or ignoring obvious signs of impending equipment failure then perhaps some razzing in in order.

 

Feh.  Lots of sand got in fruitloops today.

WTF is your problem with us?  I'd continue to get baited into your constant flaming, but I'm going to go hang out with some cool chainlinkers in person. 

James BlackHeron said:

I agree with you Dug. A skilled rider/mechanic can tell if pressure is correct just by feel -especially when riding the bike.   When a skilled mechanic is told that he perhaps should "rethink your build or your preventive maintenance routine" by someone who's tire blew up not five miles into a ride within the last 48 hours due to extreme neglect and/or ignoring obvious signs of impending equipment failure then perhaps some razzing in in order.

 

Feh.  Lots of sand got in fruitloops today.

Where is the extreme neglect? 

Just having some old tires and not being anal retentive is extreme neglect?

Wow, not only are about 50% or more of the customers extremely neglectful of their bikes but in the case of several of my own bikes I am too...

Your point is valid but I think you may be taking it to an extreme...



James BlackHeron said:

I agree with you Dug. A skilled rider/mechanic can tell if pressure is correct just by feel -especially when riding the bike.   When a skilled mechanic is told that he perhaps should "rethink your build or your preventive maintenance routine" by someone who's tire blew up not five miles into a ride within the last 48 hours due to extreme neglect and/or ignoring obvious signs of impending equipment failure then perhaps some razzing in in order.

 

Feh.  Lots of sand got in fruitloops today.

Not one mile into my commute this morning I got a pinch flat. I always check my pressures in the morning before I leave, but pinch flats happen.
Nothing you can do about it except pull over and change your tube and carry on.

I have been accused of hyperbole at times.

For me, the proof is in the pudding.   There is a continuum between hyper-vigilance and extreme neglect.   The only real way to judge is by the outcome.    With tires this can be judged by the performance to certain degree.  How MUCH do you want to avoid a flat?  What are your priorities?  Would you rather have a bike you can hop on and ignore, or do you want to avoid a pinch-flat at all costs?

The world is chock FULL of choices.  We make them every day, and every minute of every hour -and we pay for those choices by the outcomes, good & bad.   Make wise choices, or make foolish ones.  It's everyone's life to live.  And the only person's judgement that should really count is your own.

My jimmies aint rustled.

 

There is a difference between different and foolish; just because somebody holds to a different standard than you or does things a different way does not make them foolish nor does it mean the need to be picked on.

If the only judgement that matters is the individuals why do you put so much time and effort into being shitty to individuals who have a different standard of judgement than you?



James BlackHeron said:

I have been accused of hyperbole at times.

For me, the proof is in the pudding.   There is a continuum between hyper-vigilance and extreme neglect.   The only real way to judge is by the outcome.    With tires this can be judged by the performance to certain degree.  How MUCH do you want to avoid a flat?  What are your priorities?  Would you rather have a bike you can hop on and ignore, or do you want to avoid a pinch-flat at all costs?

The world is chock FULL of choices.  We make them every day, and every minute of every hour -and we pay for those choices by the outcomes, good & bad.   Make wise choices, or make foolish ones.  It's everyone's life to live.  And the only person's judgement that should really count is your own.

Yes Doug,  perhaps I really DO need to rethink my maintenance regimen...

I spent 4 hours volunteering on behalf of the chainlink the day I dropped the tandem off at my parents. Perhaps I should have refused to spend my time introducing the chainlink and cycling to other people so I could inspect my novelty bike, but I choose differently and I don't regret that choice.  I hope you did not enjoy any of my lemon cookies or the sandwiches I spend Friday night making, since you are so judgmental about how I spend my free time.

I was able to get a sag with a simple phone call, hang out with friends at the bar without a problem and enjoy myself at the manor.  This mechanical was a minor disturbance in my day, and didn't change my enjoyment of it. I still got to spend time with my friends and ride 55 miles to the manor and back. It didn't cost me any more time than having fixed the tire in advance of it failing would have. 

In my opinion, its foolish that you don't spend more time doing good for others in the bike community.  This forum is about getting people on bikes and supporting one another.  In the Chicago area its difficult to end up totally stranded in the event of a mechanical, regardless of what that mechanical is.  Putting up arrogant rants about what everyone who rides a bike should know how to do scares off new riders.  

If someone is able to get on a bike and ride with only stopping once a week at a bike shop to inflate tires and doesn't own one bike tool, they are not foolish, they are taking a step forward.  Perhaps when they have a flat a kind cyclist will stop to help them or shop will take the time to set them up with the right tools to keep them rolling.  The foolish people are the ones refusing to get on the bike at all.  

RSS

Groups

© 2008-2016   The Chainlink Community, L.L.C.   Powered by

Disclaimer  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service